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AnthropologyCriminal JusticePsychologySociology

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 126. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY
This course is the subspecialty of Physical Anthropology that involves excavation and identification of human remains for legal purposes. Students are exposed to the human skeleton and taught to examine bones for sex, age, ancestry, and stature differences. Interpretation of skeletal crime trauma is stressed. The most recent techniques and analyses in the forensic sciences, along with current and controversial trends in anthropology are discussed. Authentic case studies are used to illustrate the applied field of anthropology.  This course is intended for applied psychology and science students.  It assumes a basic familiarity with skeletal anatomy. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Corequisite: ANTH 126L. (Same as NSCI 126) One semester; three credits

ANTH 126L. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY LAB
Laboratory to accompany ANTH 126. Hands-on laboratory sessions will be used to teach basic techniques of skeletal analysis. Laboratory topics to include basic anatomy of the human skeleton, differences between animal and human remains, determination of the time interval since death, age, sex, ancestry, stature, the cause and manner of death, facial reconstruction, case report writing, etc.  Please note:  Students will be expected to respectfully handle animal and human remains. (Same as NSCI 126L) Corequisite: ANTH 126. One semester; one credit

ANTH 128. PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course is designed to introduce the student to the field of physical/biological anthropology, with an emphasis on human evolution. The larger themes investigated are the fundamentals of biological anthropology, major principles underlying our evolutionary history, and a review of the fossil evidence in an attempt to understand the development of the human species. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Corequisite: ANTH 128L. (Same as NSCI 128) One semester; three credits

ANTH 128L. PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY LAB
Laboratory to accompany ANTH 128. It includes working with hominid casts, and primate and modern human skeletal material. (Same as NSCI 128L) Corequisite: ANTH 128. One semester; one credit

ANTH 160. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (Formerly ANTH 150 and SOC 150)
This course, which deals primarily with the concerns of cultural anthropology, focuses on the study of human diversity, and what defines humanity. It explores the beliefs, values, behaviors, technologies, and environments of a wide variety of cultures in an attempt to understand and appreciate variations within the human community in addition to evolution and modern biological variation. In attempting to understand the world’s diversity, students have the opportunity to better understand themselves, their potentials, and their limitations. (Same as SOC 160) One semester; three credits

ANTH 190-199. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Courses in different areas of anthropology that are not offered on a regular basis. Corequisite: Corresponding lab course. One semester; three credits

ANTH 190L-199L. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY LABORATORIES
Laboratories to accompany ANTH 190-199. Corequisite: Corresponding ANTH 190-199 course. One semester; one credit

ANTH 280-287. SELECTED TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in anthropology. One semester; one to three credits

ANTH 290-299. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Special topics in Anthropology open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor and Honors Director. One semester; one to four credits

ANTH 301. MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (Formerly ANTH 305 and SOC 305)
Health, illness and treatment can be regarded very differently in various parts of the world and even within American society. This course will focus on the impact of beliefs and values on medicine. A range of definitions of health and illness, as well as the treatments which flow from these definitions, will be considered. (Same as SOC 301). One semester; three credits 

ANTH 350. Global Health
The course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between public health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health, how health status is measured, and the influences of various factors including social, economic, and political issues on the health of individuals and of communities. It will also introduce students to key concerns regarding nutrition, reproductive health, infectious diseases, and chronic diseases. Material will include key concepts, be practical in orientation, and global in coverage but with an important focus on the developing world and on the health of the poor. (Same as SOC 350). One semester; three credits

ANTH 351. SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY
Survey of changes in family systems over the years. Areas of study include courtship, love, mate selection, parenthood, and family problems. The course also examines cross-cultural comparisons and considers alternatives to traditional family forms. Emphasis is placed on the use of the empirical evidence to evaluate popular beliefs. (Same as SOC 351). One semester; three credits

ANTH 380-387. SELECTED TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in anthropology. One semester; one to three credits

ANTH 390-396. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Special topics in Anthropology open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor and Honors Director. One semester; one to four credits


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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 150. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
A history and overview of the field of Public Administration as a profession and an academic discipline. It is designed to give the student a solid and in-depth understanding of past, present, and future problems of administrators in managing government organizations in the political environment. Interrelationships between chief executives, legislators, the judiciary, interest groups, and bureaucracies are considered. One semester; three credits

CJ 200. CRIMINAL JUSTICE
An analysis of the structure, functions, and decision process of social agencies that deal with the management and control of crime and criminal offenders. Includes study of the nature, causes, and role of criminal behavior in society. One semester; three credits

CJ 205. CRIMINOLOGY  
This course will offer an introduction to theoretical explanations for the causes of crime. We will take a psychosocial approach to understanding crime causation and prediction through the use of data and specific theories. One semester; three credits

CJ 210. CRIMINAL LAW
Criminal Law is an examination of some of the substantive aspects of criminal law, including principles of criminal liability, specific analysis of elements of crimes, and substantive defenses to crimes. Throughout the course, there is an ongoing examination of Constitutional safeguards that control the substantive and procedural aspects in the criminal justice system. Course instruction consists of lecture, use of hypothetical case studies and reading and analysis of selected laws and court decisions. One semester; three credits

CJ 215. CORRECTIONS
This course will offer a comprehensive look at the components that make up the corrections system in the United States.  The history and future of the corrections system will be analyzed through an examination of the political and social climate in our country. One semester; three credits

CJ 220. POLICING
This course is an in-depth study of law enforcement in the United States, the largest and most visible part of the criminal justice system. Students will focus on the differences and functions of federal, state, local, county and private policing in this country. One semester; three credits

CJ 225. JUVENILE JUSTICE
The focus of this course is to examine the juvenile delinquency phenomenon through the historical context of delinquency, the changing legal environment (including major court decisions which have transformed the juvenile system), exploring the theories of the causes of juvenile delinquency, and discussion of juvenile delinquency prevention and control programs. One semester; three credits

CJ 245. CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE
This class will acquaint the student with the various players involved in the crime of child sexual abuse, dispel many of the popular myths associated with this crime and introduce the physical and behavioral indicators of abuse. The most recent research on forensic interviewing and repressed memory will be reviewed. Guest speakers will include prosecutors and police investigators with the Child Protection Investigation Team. One semester; three credits

CJ 250. SERIAL KILLERS
This class will present a brief history of the more famous serial killers in both the United States and abroad and the increasing phenomenon of serial killings will be discussed. Students will be introduced to the science of profiling and other techniques used in the investigation of serial killings and psychological profiles of two contemporary serial killers will be compared. One semester; three credits

CJ 280-287. SELECTED TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Directed work on a special topic or project in criminal justice. One semester; one to three credits

CJ 290-299. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS.
Special topics in criminal justice open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of instructor. One semester; one to four credits

CJ 315. CROSS-CULTURAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Crime, justice, and retribution vary tremendously around the globe. Some cultures have meetings with parties rather than courts, and, in some, suspects merely vanish never to be seen again. This course will look at varieties of concepts of crime, wrongdoing, punishment (or lack of), and systems for dealing with these in other parts of the world, and compare some of these systems to the criminal justice system and its ideology in the United States. One semester; three credits

CJ 362. SOCIOLOGY OF ADDICTION
(Same as SOC 362) Prerequisite: SOC 101. One semester; three credits

CJ 365. DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
An exploration of theoretical perspectives on deviance, problems in defining deviance and specific categories of deviance. Deviant behaviors discussed may include but are not limited to prostitution, gambling, transgenderedness, pornography, mental illness, sexualities, and physical disability. (Same as PSYC 365 and SOC 365) One semester; three credits

CJ 370. APPLICATIONS OF MEMORY
An examination of the application of memory in such diverse areas as courtroom testimony (e.g., factors influencing witnesses, hypnosis, repressed memory, false memory), memory for everyday events, memory aids, and advertising. The relevant theories and research in each area are examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. (Same as PSYC 370) One semester; three credits

CJ 380-387. SELECTED TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Directed work on a special topic or project in criminal justice. One semester; one to three credits

CJ 390-399. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Special topics in criminal justice open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor and Honors Director. One semester; three credits.

CJ 401. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
(Same as POLS 471) Prerequisite: POLS 112 or HIST 151 or Permissions of the department chair. One semester; three credits

CJ 455. CORRECTIONAL COUNSELING
This course is designed to present some of the counseling and treatment techniques that are available to assist correctional workers toward assisting the offender to establish a satisfying lifestyle that conforms to the regulations as well as protecting the community from harmful activity by offenders placed under the correctional workers’ supervision. (Same as PSYC 455) One semester; three credits

CJ 480-487. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Directed work on a special topic or project in criminal justice. One semester; one to three credits


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PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 105. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to the discipline of psychology as a science of behavior. Areas of study include biological aspects of psychology, learning, sensation, perception, personality, abnormal behavior, psychological testing and research, social and developmental psychology. Psychology and Applied Psychology majors must complete the course with a grade of “C” or better. One semester; three credits

PSYC 106. PSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR
An introduction to the psychology major, this course will focus on how to make the most of a psychology degree. Topics will include careers, skill development, resumes, research, graduate school, internships, and options within the major. Students will meet once a week. Each session will be led by a Behavioral Sciences faculty member. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; zero credit

PSYC 218. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
An examination of developmental trends, principles, and processes through the lifespan. This course investigates human development at all stages and ages with attention to biological, social, and cognitive development. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 219. PERSONALITY
A survey of major personality theories and perspectives in terms of conceptions, applications, and research. Emphasis is placed on the dispositional, biological, motivational, social, and cultural perspectives of personality.  Also discussed are personality assessment, stress, and personality disorders and adjustment. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 223. FOUNDATIONS OF FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY
An examination of the field of forensic psychology including professional training, forensic work settings, and the application of psychological knowledge to forensic issues like risk assessment, custody evaluations, assessment of sanity, competency, eyewitness testimony, jury decision making, police stress, and criminal profiling.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 225. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Views the study of human and animal behavior within the context of biological principles. Areas covered include brain-behavior relationships, sensory processes, and biological bases for emotional behavior, sexual behavior, and psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 226. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE CINEMA
In this course we look at understanding movies as a psychological process through the use of film technique. We study the influential role of movies in society. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 227. SPORT PSYCHOLOGY
Examines psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to the field of sport and exercise psychology and to provide an overview of basic research and practical implementations in this applied specialization of psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 228. PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDIA
This course investigates the media construction of reality by examining media representations of different social constructs. Students examine how reality is created from a cognitive psychological and social-cognitive approach and from different media theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 229. HONORS PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDIA
This course investigates the media construction of reality by examining media representations of different social constructs. Students examine how reality is created from a cognitive psychological and social-cognitive approach and from different media theories. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program or special permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

PSYC 230. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
A survey of various types of mental disorders including their causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 231. HONORS PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
This course will critically examine current and historical views of mental illness. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the social stigma of mental illness and placing mental illness in economic, historical, and socio-political frameworks. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program. One semester; three credits

PSYC 235. FUNDAMENTALS OF APA WRITING STYLE AND ETHICS
Students will learn to write an APA-style research paper. They will write an APA-style research proposal with the potential of completing the research in the Correlational or Experimental Methods  course. Students will also learn other research reporting methods including Powerpoint and poster presentations. Students will complete certification in APA ethics. Open to other students by instructor permission only. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 240. ANIMAL COGNITION
A study of the mental processes of animals with a comparative emphasis on human-animal cognitive processes viewed within an evolutionary context. Topics include language learning and communication, concept formation, problem solving, intelligence, emotion, and construction of artifacts. Similarities in animal-human developmental processes will be examined as well as current research on animal cognition. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 270. DYNAMICS OF GENDER
This class will critically examine how norms, beliefs, ideologies, language, culture and institutions influence gender behavior, traditional conceptions of masculinity and femininity, and socialization for masculine and feminine roles. (Same as SOC 270) Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or SOC 101. One semester; three credits

PSYC 275. GRADUATE SCHOOL & PROFESSIONAL CAREERS IN PSYCHOLOGY
A survey of various professional careers in psychology and a thorough examination of the graduate school application and admissions process. Careers examined may include but are not limited to clinical/counseling, forensic, consumer, sports, educational, industrial/ organizational, and academics. This course is intended primarily for those students who plan to pursue a graduate education in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 and Sophomore standing. One semester; three credits

PSYC 280-287. SELECTED TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in psychology. One semester; one to three credits

PSYC 290-299. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in psychology open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of instructor and Honors Director. One semester; one to four credits

PSYC 301. ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY
Engineering psychology, also called human factors, ergonomics or usability engineering, deals with the importance of designing for human use. Equipment that is not ergonomically sound will be operated a little more slowly and be a little more prone to error. Our goal in this class is to provide a solid foundation in the principles of human performance and a broad overview of the field of human factors. This class provides the student with an understanding of the variables that influence human performance and the ways in which the human factors expert draws on this knowledge. The analysis of human performance requires frequent contact with real-world situations in which people actually perform. This course provides an integrated approach to the study of human factors, embedding the principles of human factors within a foundation based on contemporary views of human performance. Topics include the following: perception, cognition, movement, and environment. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 303. POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
The attack on the World Trade Center, Hurricane Katrina, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the BP oil spill, trapped Chilean miners, earthquakes in Haiti, floods in Pakistan, tsunamis in Indonesia, murder and displacement in Darfur, massacre in Tiananmen Square. Survivors of these events experienced extreme trauma. Sometimes the consequences of these traumatic experiences cause the person to have trouble dealing with life for months or years. We call this extreme reaction post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Knowledge of PTSD may help an individual become more resilient after experiencing extreme stress. The goal of this course is to familiarize the student with the disorder in order to understand the consequences of severe trauma. Understanding PTSD is necessary not just for mental health providers, but also for the individual who may experience, or knows someone who experiences, severe trauma, and the citizen concerned about the well-being of war veterans. In this course we will examine PTSD in depth; anxiety disorders; history and prevalence of PTSD; specific traumas (including combat and sexual assault); symptoms, biology, consequences, impact and treatment of PTSD. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits 

PSYC 305.  PROBLEM SOLVING AND DECISION MAKING
The objective of this course is to improve people’s ability to solve problems and make decisions using psychological material discussed in class.  Students will learn to improve their practical problem solving skills by learning to recognize and overcome conceptual blocks to problem solving.  Topics to be covered include creativity, methods of problem solving, memory aids, decision-making tolls, avoiding biases of judgment, etc.  Students will be given assignments revolving around practical problems and decisions (e.g., how to improve time management).  Prerequisite:  PSYC 105. One semester, three credits

PSYC 310. DEATH AND DYING
A course considering relevant topics relating to death and the dying process from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Course content includes the meaning of death, the dying process in historical context and in contemporary culture, bereavement, grief, and mourning, approaches to terminal care, death and childhood, violent death, suicide, death industries, the right to die, and surviving death. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. (Same as SOC 310) One semester; three credits

PSYC 315. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course focuses on the application of psychology to the school setting. It is intended to assist students in mastering an organized sampling of scientific knowledge about human development, learning, motivation, individual differences, and evaluation. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 320. HONORS SEMINAR DEATH AND DYING
This seminar focuses on critically examining and understanding death, the dying process, grief, the ethics of life/death, and a variety of related issues. It integrates a number of multidisciplinary perspectives and resources, emphasizes the exercise of critical thinking and implements the philosophy of writing as an integral means of learning. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program or special permission of the instructor. (Same as SOC 320) One semester; three credits 

PSYC 325. TOPICS IN AGING
This course focuses on the following issues in aging: the impact of aging on the individual, the family, and society; the quality of later life; societal attitudes toward old age; problems and potentials of aging; retirement; living environments in later life; societal policies, programs and services for older Americans. The diversity in the aging process due to differences in gender, race, and social class is emphasized. (Same as SOC 325) Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or SOC 101. One semester; three credits

PSYC 340. FUNDAMENTALS OF COUNSELING
This course presents counseling in a broad manner covering its history, theories, processes, issues, specialties, and trends. In addition, this course concentrates on the importance of the personhood of counselors and of the multicultural, ethical, and legal environments in which counselors operate. Prerequisites: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 343. APPLIED CRISIS INTERVENTION STRATEGIES
This course presents the fundamental concepts, theories, strategies, and skills needed to understand and conduct effective crisis intervention. By studying case illustrations, it focuses on applying intervention strategies to several of the currently most prevalent types of crisis in the human experience. In addition, this course considers the importance of the personhood of the worker and crises that may occur in the human service workplace. Prerequisite PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 345. HUMAN SEXUALITY
A survey study of topics in human sexuality. Topics included are basic reproductive anatomy, hormonal influences on behaviors, attraction, relationships, sexual variations, birth control, and sexually transmitted diseases. Self-assessment surveys on sexual attitudes are discussed in class. (Same as SOC 345) Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 350. INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (Formerly PSYC 352)
This course examines the contributions of psychology to effective human resources development and management. The course content is designed for Psychology and Business majors and focuses on the practical applications of psychology in the business world. Topics include the psychology of organizations, motivation and supervision, employee selection and development, legal considerations, evaluation, and organizational development. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 351. ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (Formerly PSYC 350)
This course is an exploration of theory and research relevant to the physical, psychological, and social transitions associated with early, middle, and late adolescence. Developmental issues examined include the formulation of identity establishing autonomy, moral development, social interaction, and the transformations associated with puberty, as well as the identification and understanding of problems and psychopathology in adolescence. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 353. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
A study of the social-psychological aspects of human interactions. Areas of study include: affiliation, social perception, attribution processes, interpersonal attraction, aggression, attitude formation, attitude change, conformity, compliance, cooperation, competition, group structure, and group dynamics. (Same as SOC 353) Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 354. CORRELATIONAL RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS
An introduction to the fundamentals of research methods and statistical analysis in the Behavioral Sciences. Students will learn and apply basics of research methodology and basic statistical techniques with an emphasis on correlational methods. Students will conduct a correlational research project which will be presented to other students and faculty. Prerequisite: PSYC 235 and ALG 110 and 120 or ALG 115 or higher. Required for all Psychology and Applied Psychology majors. Open to other students by instructor permission only. One semester; three credits

PSYC 355. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS
An introduction to basic experimental research design and related statistical analyses. Students will be required to design and conduct an experimental research project which will be presented to other students and faculty. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in PSYC 354. Required for all Psychology majors. Open to other students by instructor permission only. One semester; three credits

PSYC 364. STEREOTYPING AND PREJUDICE
This course will analyze and discuss issues related to stereotyping and prejudice, including psychological theory and empirical research on the topic. We will examine the origins, functions, and consequences of stereotyping and prejudice as well as measurement strategies. We will examine issues surrounding the persons both engaging in and targeted by stereotyping and prejudice and discuss historical and contemporary social and political issues relevant to the course. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. (Same as SOC 364). One semester; three credits

PSYC 365. DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
An exploration of theoretical perspectives on deviance, problems in defining deviance and specific categories of deviance. Deviant behaviors discussed may include but are not limited to prostitution, gambling, transgenderedness, pornography, mental illness, sexualities, and physical disability. (Same as CJ 365 and SOC 365). One semester; three credits

PSYC 370. APPLICATIONS OF MEMORY
An examination of the application of memory in such diverse areas as courtroom testimony (e.g., factors influencing witnesses, hypnosis, repressed memory, false memory), memory for everyday events, memory aids, and advertising. The relevant theories and research in each area are examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. (Same as CJ 370) One semester; three credits

PSYC 380-387. SELECTED TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in psychology. One semester; one to three credits

PSYC 390-399. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Special topics in psychology open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the Instructor and Honors Director. One semester; three credits.

PSYC 416. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING
An in-depth examination of concepts, theoretical issues, and research findings involving the psychology of learning. Areas of study include classical and instrumental conditioning, principles of reinforcement and punishment, and other factors affecting learning. This course has a service-learning component. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 440. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
This course is designed to investigate the nature of the thinking mind. Cognitive psychology involves understanding how we gain information of the world, how it is transformed into knowledge, stored in memory, and accessed when needed. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

PSYC 450, 451. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN PSYCHOLOGY
These courses are a two semester sequence intended for advanced (junior status or higher) students who wish additional experience in research design and statistical analysis. In PSYC 450 the student will investigate in depth a specialized topic in psychology resulting in a proposal that will include a literature review, hypotheses and proposed research design. In PSYC 451 the student will further investigate the topic by engaging in empirical research that is then analyzed, interpreted, and presented in a manuscript. These courses are recommended for students intending to continue their education in a graduate program. Prerequisites: PSYC 354, 355 and permission from the chair of Behavioral Sciences. Two semesters; two credits each

PSYC 453. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSUASION
This course examines the scientific and social psychological processes that underlie persuasion, Attitude formation and measurement as well as resistance to persuasion will also be examined. Persuasion as it applies to political campaigns, propaganda, and advertising and consumer behavior will be addressed, along with other relevant topics. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits.

PSYC 455. CORRECTIONAL COUNSELING
(Same as CJ 455) One semester; three credits

PSYC 460. PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY
The practicum offered for majors with senior status includes several options. The first is a formal internship consisting of 100 hours of professional in-field experience. It is a well-structured program in which students will be required to meet a number of objectives related to their goals, their developing competence, and their interests in psychology and related fields. A 2.5 GPA is required to pursue this option. The second option involves a research assistantship in which seniors will assist practicing graduate-level and professional-level researchers in conducting their projects. Sound performance in the statistics and research courses is a prerequisite for this option.  A third option involves the opportunity to be a learning facilitator mentored by a full-time faculty member. In this capacity, the student provides support services to a faculty member in a specific course.  These services include preparation of presentation materials, development of study guides, the convening and leading of study groups, peer editing, and the compilation of course-related research. This option may be particularly valuable to students seeking careers in academic fields. The guidelines and requirements for this option have been developed and are made available to interested students upon request. A final option is an individually-designed project suited to the needs, interests, and academic strengths of the student. The project will be conducted under the direction of a full-time faculty member. Guidelines for the formal proposals are available. Plans for any of these options should be developed and approved by the Practicum Director the semester before the course is taken. Prerequisite: Senior standing. One semester; three credits

PSYC 480-487. ADVANCED TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in psychology. One semester; one to three credits

PSYC 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE
Readings, evaluation and analysis of selected topics in the discipline. May require a comprehensive individual empirical research project or other final project to be presented to and approved by departmental faculty. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. One semester; three credits

PSYC 497. PSYCHOLOGY COMPREHENSIVES
Seniors will be required to take a comprehensive examination on selected areas of psychology. Students are required to have completed or be currently enrolled in their final psychology courses before taking the exam.  This course commences through email and requires monitored email access, so students are responsible for contacting the instructor at the beginning of the semester to confirm enrollment and schedule the exam. Prerequisite: PSYC 105, PSYC 219, PSYC 230, PSYC 353, PSYC 354, PSYC 440. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; zero credit 

PSYC 499. ADVANCED INTERNSHIP
This course is intended for students who have completed the requirements for PSYC 460 at an exemplary level and either (a) wish to pursue further opportunities or directed field research at their original field placement or (b) wish to pursue an additional field placement consistent with the goals of the internship program and the developing interests of the students. Permission of the Practicum Director is required. One semester; three credits

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SOCIOLOGY

SOC 101. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
An introduction to the sociological perspective. Sociology seeks to explain the origin and functioning of social behavior as it appears in such areas as the family, religion, economic structures, political structures, schools, deviant behavior, cultural norms, and other areas of human social interaction. As part of the process, students will be introduced to basic sociological terms, concepts, and theories. One semester; three credits

SOC 160. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (Formerly ANTH 150 and SOC 150)
(Same as ANTH 160) One semester; three credits

SOC 202. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS
The course focuses on a “systems approach” to social reality and provides students with the opportunity to comprehend, analyze, and evaluate social conditions, problems, and alternative solutions. Seeks to explore the critical assumptions that inform clashing views on controversial social issues. Students develop and practice skills of social policy analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 101 and Junior standing. One semester; three credits

SOC 270. DYNAMICS OF GENDER
(Same as PSYC 270) Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or SOC 101. One semester; three credits

SOC 271. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (formerly SOC 371)
The study of the beliefs, practices, and organizational forms of religion using the tools and methods of sociology. Topics covered may include the relation of beliefs to social conditions, the role of religion in cultural formation and public life, religious pluralism and conflict, the nature of religious cults and sects, the influence of religion on racial, gender, and sexuality issues, and the affect modernity has on religious belief and practice. (same as RS 271). Prerequisite: SOC 101. One semester; three credits

SOC 280-287. SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY
Directed research on a special topic or project in sociology. One semester; one to three credits

SOC 290-299. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in behavioral sciences open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. One semester; one to four credits

SOC 301. MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (Formerly ANTH 305 and SOC 305)
(Same as ANTH 301) One semester; three credits

SOC 310. DEATH AND DYING
(Same as PSYC 310) One semester; three credits

SOC 320. HONORS SEMINAR: DEATH AND DYING
(Same as PSYC 320) Prerequisite: Membership in Honors Program or special permission of instructor. One semester; three credits

SOC 325. TOPICS IN AGING
(Same as PSYC 325) Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or SOC 101. One semester; three credits

SOC 345. HUMAN SEXUALITY
(Same as PSYC 345) Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or SOC 101. One semester; three credits

SOC 350. GLOBAL HEALTH
The course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between public health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health, how health status is measured, and the influences of various factors, including social, economic, and political issues on the health of individuals and of communities. It will also introduce students to key concerns regarding nutrition, reproductive health, infectious diseases, and chronic diseases. Material will include key concepts, be practical in orientation, and global in coverage, but with an important focus on the developing world and on the health of the poor. (Same as ANTH 350). One semester; three credits

SOC 351. SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY
A survey of changes in family systems over the years. Areas of study include courtship, love, mate selection, parenthood, and family problems. The course also examines cross-cultural comparisons and considers alternatives to traditional family forms. Emphasis is placed on the use of the empirical evidence to evaluate popular beliefs. Same as ANTH 351. One semester; three credits

SOC 353. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
(Same as PSYC 353) Prerequisite: PSYC 105. One semester; three credits

SOC 362. SOCIOLOGY OF ADDICTION
A social scientific approach to the nature, role, and effects of chemical and psychological addiction in society. Explores a variety of addiction issues as they relate to the social institutions of family, education, politics, and medicine. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Same as CJ 362) One semester; three credits

SOC 364. STEREOTYPING AND PREJUDICE
This course will analyze and discuss issues related to stereotyping and prejudice, including psychological theory and empirical research on the topic. We will examine the origins, functions, and consequences of stereotyping and prejudice as well as measurement strategies. We will examine issues surrounding the persons both engaging in and targeted by stereotyping and prejudice and discuss historical and contemporary social and political issues relevant to the course. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. (Same as PSYC 364). One semester; three credits

SOC 365. DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
An exploration of theoretical perspectives on deviance, problems in defining deviance and specific categories of deviance. Deviant behaviors discussed may include but are not limited to prostitution, gambling, transgenderedness, pornography, mental illness, sexualities, and physical disability. (Same as PSYC 365) One semester; three credits

SOC 380-387. SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in Sociology. One semester; one to three credits

SOC 390-396. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in Sociology open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. One semester; one to three credits

SOC 450, 451. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN SOCIOLOGY
These courses are intended for advanced (junior  status or higher) students who wish additional experience in research. In SOC 450 the student will investigate in depth a specialized topic in sociology or a related discipline (e.g., anthropology, criminal justice). In SOC 451 the student will further investigate the topic by engaging in empirical research that is then analyzed, interpreted, and presented in a manuscript. These courses are recommended for students who may intend to continue their education in a graduate program. Prerequisites:  Permission of instructor and the Chair of Behavioral Sciences. One to two semesters; one to three credits each

SOC 480-487. ADVANCED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY
Directed work on a special topic or project in Sociology. One semester; one to three credits.

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