AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Student using a bunsen burner

Courses

For Course Syllabi, please consult individual Faculty pages.

BIOL 101. PUBLIC HEALTH
This course provides students with an introduction to fundamental concepts and approaches underlying public health. Topics covered include evidence and prevention-based perspectives on health; the social context of health and health disparities; environment and health; health and our food system; the role of community in public health; effective public health interventions; ethical issues in public health; and future directions in public health.  Special focus will be paid to the South, Memphis, and the topic of HIV/AIDS. Offered even numbered Fall semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 102. Principles of EPIDEMIOLOGY
This course provides students with an introduction to fundamental concepts and approaches underlying public health. Topics covered include evidence and prevention-based perspectives on health; the social context of health and health disparities; environment and health; health and our food system; the role of community in public health; effective public health interventions; ethical issues in public health; and future directions in public health.  Special focus will be paid to the South, Memphis, and the topic of HIV/AIDS. Three credits. Offered even numbered fall semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 103. BIOLOGY OF ADDICTION
In this course, we will cover the biological effects of alcohol and drugs on human organ systems, particularly the nervous, digestive, excretory and reproductive systems. We will discuss the psychological and sociological consequences of these effects. The use of drugs in both therapeutic and pathologic situations will be explored, and modalities of recovery will be discussed. Offered in the Spring semester. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Credits not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; three credits

BIOL 103L. BIOLOGY OF ADDICTION LAB
In this course, we will examine the anatomy and physiology of organ systems affected by alcohol and other psychoactive drugs of abuse. We will use fruit flies as a model to determine the effects of alcohol on their physiology and reproductive success. We will conduct two experiments on human volunteers: effects of caffeine on the cardiovascular system and the effects of ethanol on balance, equilibrium, and judgment. With the laboratory component, this course fulfills University graduation requirements. Offered in the Spring semester. Credit not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; one credit

BIOL 105. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
A study of the basic scientific principles required for an understanding of how ecosystems work. Emphasis will be given to nutrient cycling, soil structure, and composition, basic meteorology, air and water pollution and conservation, structure and energy flow in ecosystems, food production and hunger in the world, demographics, epidemics and emergent diseases, and consequences of the disruption of natural systems. This course does not fulfill the general education requirements. Credits not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 106. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of biology with emphasis on cellular structure and physiology, including cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and transmission of hereditary information. A broad overview of biological diversity, interaction between organisms and their physical envirnoment, as well as the structure and function of the major human organ systems is included. This course is designed for education majors enrolled in the Graduate & Professional Studies Program. Day students may not register for this course. There is no laboratory associated with this course. General education requirements are not fulfilled by this course. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Enrolled in Graduate & Professional Studies. Liberal Studies majors only. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

BIOL 107. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment, the course provides the scientific basis for understanding how environmental systems work. Topics include discussion of the economic impact and consequences of the disruptions of natural systems, the importance of public policy, and how environmental issues are linked to our everyday life. Designed for non-majors. Corequisite: BIOL 107L. Offered as needed. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Credits not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; three credits

BIOL 107L. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY
A combination of laboratory experiences and field trips to illustrate the principles covered in BIOL 107. Visits to sewage treatment plant, pest control center, land fill and forests will be scheduled when possible. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 107. Offered as needed. Credit not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; one credit

BIOL 109. HUMAN BIOLOGY 
A systematic study of the developmental structure and function of the human organism, including the anatomy and physiology of each organ system and common problems that may occur in each. Genetics, evolution, and ecology, as they apply to the human organism, are also studied. Designed for non-majors. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 109L. Offered as needed. Credits not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; three credits

BIOL 109L. HUMAN BIOLOGY LABORATORY 
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 109. Offered in the Fall semester. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 109. Credit not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; one credit

BIOL 111. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I
The first half of a comprehensive study of contemporary biology, this semester covers biochemistry, cytology, energy metabolism, photosynthesis, cell division, genetics, evolution, systematics and taxonomy of viruses, prokaryotes, protists, and fungi. This course includes three lectures and one discussion section per week. Prerequisite: ACT of 22 or higher, or a grade of C or better in CHEM 101. Corequisites: BIOL 111L and CHEM 101 or higher. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 111L. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 111. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 111. One semester; one credit

BIOL 112. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II
Continuation of BIOL 111, this semester covers systematics and taxonomy of plants and animals, anatomy and physiology of eukaryotic organisms, embryology and development, and ecology. This course includes three lectures and one discussion per week. Offered in the Fall and Spring semesters and usually in Summer Term II. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 and CHEM 101 or higher. Corequisite BIOL 112L. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 112L. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 112. Prerequisite: BIOL 111L. Corequisite: BIOL 112. One semester; one credit

BIOL 210. ECOLOGICAL CENSUS TECHNIQUES
This is a field-intensive introduction to the techniques and statistical analyses used in population and community ecology. Experimental design and data collection will be stressed on major groups of organisms, including invertebrates, small mammals, and plants. This course requires mandatory overnight exercises to tentatively be taught at the Edward J. Meeman Biological Field Station and several day trips to various locations throughout the mid-south. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 with C or better, CHEM 113 with C or better and permission of instructor. One semester; three credits

BIOL 211. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY
A study of human embryology with emphasis on the fundamental development processes common to vertebrate embryos. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, and development of the embryo from zygote through the differentiation of the neural tube. The second half of the course is devoted to the development of selected human organ systems including the nervous system, sense organs, and the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 and 112 and CHEM 113 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 211L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 211L. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 211. Histological, preserved, and selected living materials are studied to illustrate gametogenesis, fertilization, and development of the vertebrate embryo from zygote through the differentiation of organ systems in amphibian, avian, and mammalian embryos. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 211. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 212. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY
A study of the structural and functional evolution of selected organ systems in representative vertebrates, the first part of the course reviews the phylogenetic relationships among the vertebrates. In the remainder of the course, structures and their organizations are interpreted in terms of their embryological development, phylogeny, and functional adaptations. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 and 112 and CHEM 113 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 212L. Offered in the Spring semester.  One semester; three credits.

BIOL 212L. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 212. Dissection of preserved representative specimens including shark, amphibian, and cat is required. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 212. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit.

BIOL 213.  MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC TERMINOLOGY
This course examines the Latin and Greek origins of words used in the scientific and medical community. In addition to learning the basic meaning of these words, their prefixes, suffixes and combining forms will also be studied. Emphasis will be given to terms applicable to the systems, structure, function and diseases of the human body, also terms applying to veterinary science as well as zoological, botanical, chemical, and geological terms. Attention will be given to pronunciation, spelling and common abbreviations used in scientific writings. Practice with medical and veterinary records will be included.  An understanding of etymology will give students in any area of specialization a better comprehension of the fundamental meaning of many English words. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher. Offered as needed. One semester; two credits

BIOL 216. BOTANY 
A comprehensive study of the principles of botany. Topics include a survey of the major groups of plants, algae, and fungi, their life cycles, anatomy, metabolism, biogeography, ecology and evolution. All scheduled field trips are mandatory. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 216L. Offered in odd numbered Fall semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 216L. BOTANY LABORATORY 
A comprehensive field-based study of the principles of botany. There will be several mandatory field trips throughout the semester that involve travel to local sites so that students gain a better understanding of the local flora and how to gather and prepare specimens In the field. Prerequisite: BIOL 112L and CHEM 113 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 216. Offered in odd numbered Fall semesters. One semester; one credit

BIOL 217. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
The first half of a study of the various levels of organization of the human body. The first semester covers cells, cell metabolism, tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 111 and 112 BIOL 112L and CHEM 113 or higher; Corequisite: BIOL 217L. Offered in the Fall semester.  One semester; three credits. 

BIOL 217L. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LABORATORY 
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 217. Dissection of a preserved mammalian specimen is required. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 217. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 218. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
A continuation of BIOL 217, this semester covers the cardiovascular, immune, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems. Students will be responsible for a nominal fee to cover the required CPR course. Prerequisites: BIOL 217, 217L and CHEM 113. Corequisite: BIOL 218L. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 218L. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LABORATORY 
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 218. Dissection of a preserved mammalian specimen is required. Prerequisite BIOL 217, BIOL 217L, and CHEM 113. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 218. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 236. NUTRITION
The basic principles of nutrition are studied with particular emphasis on their applications to human health and development. This course includes a study of the essential nutrients; current and past dietary trends, including ethnic considerations; relationship of RDAs and diets to health, disease, and causes of death; changes in individual nutrient requirements based on factors such as age, gender, heredity, environment, etc.; governmental legislation regarding food labels, processing additives, contaminants, preservatives, and dietary guidelines; and a personal assessment of one’s own eating habits, requirements, and potential health problems. Outside reading materials related to current nutritional “trends” will be assigned. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

BIOL 240. INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS
The course considers introductory topics in bioinformatics. Topics include the structure of DNA, string representation in PERL, data searches, pairwise alignments, substitution patterns, protein structure prediction and modeling, proteomies and the use of web-based tools for topics in bioinformatics. Offered in even-numbered Spring semesters. (Same as CS 240). Prerequisite: BIOL 111. One semester; three credits

BIOL 290-299.  SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY
Selected topics of interest.  Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher; permission of the Instructor. Corequisite: The laboratory course if offered. One semester; one to four credits

BIOL 290L-299L. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 290-299L. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher; permission of the Instructor .Corequisite: The lecture course. One semester; one credit

BIOL 303. ALGAE, FUNGI AND LICHENS
This course will focus on the diversity and comparative study of the structure, function, reproduction, growth, development, ecology, evolution and natural history of algae, fungi and lichens. Economic importance and uses of the various organisms will also be covered. Pre-requisite: BIOL 112 and BIOL 112L with C or better and CHEM 113 and CHEM 113L with C or better. Corequisite: BIOL 303L. One semester; three credits

BIOL 303L. ALGAE, FUNGI AND LICHENS LABORATORY
Laboratory exercises will focus on field trip collection and identification of the various algae, fungi and lichen organisms. Taxonomic keys and various chemical tests and laboratory techniques will be used. Proper preserving and herbarium mounting techniques for the lichens will also be covered. Pre-requisite: BIOL 112 and BIOL 112L with C or better and CHEM 113 and CHEM 113L with C or better. Co-requisite: BIOL 303. One semester; one credit

BIOL 304. LIMNOLOGY
Limnology is the study of inland waters, lakes, ponds, rivers and streams.  This course examines physical, chemical and biological variables that influence living organisms in these ecosystems.  Both theoretical and applied aspects of limnology will be covered.  Ecological theories will be examined and studies on aquatic ecosystems, which have been used to test these theories, will be discussed.  The role of limnology in the management of water resources will be discussed throughout the course.  Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, BIOL 111 and 112, CHEM 113 and 114. Co-requisite: BIOL 304L Limnology Laboratory. Offered in odd-numbered spring semesters (alternates with Invertebrate Zoology). One semester; three credits.

BIOL 304L. LIMNOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory course to illustrate principles covered in BIOL 304. Several labs will be field trips followed by analysis and discussion of the data collected. This provides the opportunity to ask questions in limnology, illustrate the variation in aquatic habitats, demonstrate the practical aspects of limnology (sampling methods, etc.) and the methods of analyzing and writing up collected data.  Participation in scheduled field trips is mandatory.   Group III biology elective. Co-requisite: BIOL 304 Limnology. One semester; one credit.

BIOL 311. GENETICS
A study of the structure and function of nucleic acids in viruses, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes along with basic concepts, principles and applications of classical, molecular and population genetics. Topics include recombinent technology, genetics and cancer, developmental and behavioral genetics, genetic engineering. Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in BIOL 112 and CHEM 212. Corequisite: BIOL 311L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

BIOL 311L. GENETICS LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 311. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 311. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 312. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
A study of the biochemical and biophysical mechanism underlying human physiology and pathophysiology at a system level. Emphasis is placed on the role of membranes, nerves, and hormones in maintaining homeostasis. Prerequisite: BIOL 112, BIOL 112L. Recommended: CHEM 211 and 211L, 315 and PHYS 201. Corequisite BIOL 315L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

BIOL 312L. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 312. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 312. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 321. MICROBIOLOGY
A study of microbial biochemistry, molecular biology, morphology, physiology, metabolism, growth and growth control, taxonomy, diversity, genetics, evolution, ecology, and immunology with emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Topics in medical, food, industrial, microbiology, and public health. Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in BIOL 112 and CHEM 211 and Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: BIOL 321L. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

BIOL 321L. MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 321. Corequisite: BIOL 321. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 335. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY
Taxonomy, ecology, evolution, morphology, and physiology of invertebrate phyla. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher, 7 additional credits in Biology at the 200 level or higher, and junior or senior status. Corequisite: BIOL 335L. Offered in odd numbered Fall semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 335L. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles in BIOL 335. Students are required to participate in the Gulf Coast Field trip. Offered in odd numbered Fall semesters. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 335. One semester; one credit

BIOL 346. EVOLUTION
Investigation of the evidence, proponents, and theories of organic evolution with emphasis on modern contributions to the understanding of speciation. Topics covered in this course includes macroevolution, phylogenetics and evolutionary history of major groups of organisms, genetic drift, evolution of genomes, variation, genetical theory of natural selection, and phenotypic evolution. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher. Offered in odd numbered Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 350. RESEARCH METHODS
This course is designed for students who are involved in research projects that will not be considered for their senior research thesis. Students should either be in a research program or working with a researched off campus. Students should participate in a minimum of 200 hours on the research project.The students will be required to be familiar with several techniques within their research and describe how they are used in research. In addition to the description of the techniques the students will summarize their research experience and data in a short narrative. Prerequisites: BIOL 112, BIOL 112L, CHEM 114, CHEM 114L, permission of the instructor or Chair of the Department. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits 

BIOL 362. BIOLOGY SEMINAR
Seminar series in which research scientists are invited to discuss their current research. Students will create a research poster describing a paper from the primary literature. Students will also submit a research proposal for summer research that will be conducted as a requirement for BIOL 463/464/465, Mentored Research. Pre-requisites or co-requisites are: Junior standing, a grade of C or better in a minimum of two 200 – 400 level biology courses, a grade of C or better in CHEM 212, a Science GPA of 2.0 or higher, or permission of the instructor or Chair of the Department. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 366. RESEARCH METHODS
This course is designed for students who are involved in research projects that will not be considered for their senior research thesis. Students should be either in a research program or working with a  researcher off campus. Students should participate in a minimum of 200 hours on their research project. Students will be required to be familiar with several techniques with their research and describe how they are used in research. In addition to the description of the techniques the students will summarize their research experiencee and data in a short narrative. Prerequisites: BIOL 112, BIOL 112L, CHEM 114 and CHEM 114L. Permission of the Instructor or Chair of the Department. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

BIOL 367. PHARMACOLOGY
An introduction to the structure, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, therapeutic uses, and adverse reactions of prototypic agents from the major categories of drugs. Prerequisites: CHEM 212, and either BIOL 217 and 218 or BIOL 312. Offered in odd numbered Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 369. HERPETOLOGY
Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles. In this course we will examine the major taxonomic groups of amphibia and reptilia in depth, focusing on local groups and surveying the more interesting exotic members of these taxa to gain an understanding of their diversity. Life history, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and conservation issues are among the topics that will be discussed. Prerequisites BIOL 111, 112, CHEM 113 or higher, seven additional credits of biology at the 200 level or higher, and Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: BIOL 369L. Offered in even numbered Spring semesters. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 369L. HERPETOLOGY LAB
The student will learn to visually identify (to species level) the amphibians and reptiles naturally found in Western Tennessee and the tri-state area. Additionally, the student will learn to identify amphibians by vocalization (frog calls). Initial identification will take place in the lab using preserved specimens and also digital images and sounds. Identification skills will continue to be developed in the field while on field trips to nearby sites. Field techniques for performing natural history surveys will be discussed, followed by implementation in the field. Prerequisites BIOL 111, 112, CHEM 113 or higher, seven additional credits of biology at the 200 level or higher, and Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: BIOL 369L. Offered in even numbered Spring semesters. One semester; one credit.

BIOL 370. TOXICOLOGY 
An introduction to the basic principles of toxicology including investigation of the sites and modes of action of toxic agents and the factors affecting their toxicity, this course will also examine sources, fate, and effects of environmental pollutants. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and CHEM 212. Offered in Spring semester of even numbered years. One semester; three credits

BIOL 381. ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
The study of the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include methods for the observation and quantification of behavior, natural selection and evolution of behavior, behavior genetics, neural and physiological mechanisms of behavior, communication, aggression, sexual reproduction, mating systems, and interspecific behavioral interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL 111, 112, CHEM 113 or higher, and seven additional credits of Biology at the 200 level or higher, and Junior or Senior standing. Offered in even numbered Spring semesters. Group III Biology elective. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 390-398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY
Selected topics of interest. Prerequisite: BIOL 112, CHEM 113 or higher, and 4 credits in Biology at the 200 level or higher; permission of the instructor. One semester; one to four credits

BIOL 390-398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY LAB
Selected topics of interest. Prerequisite: BIOL 112, CHEM 113 or higher, and 4 credits in Biology at the 200 level or higher; permission of the instructor. Corequisite: the lecture course. One semester; one credit

BIOL 412. ECOLOGY
Study of the principles of ecology. Topics to be investigated include population organization, demographics and regulation, ecosystem and community structure/function, abiotic factors, and cycling of energy. Prerequisites: BIOL 112, CHEM 113 or higher, seven additional credits in Biology at the 200 level or higher, and junior or senior standing. Corequisite: BIOL 412L. Offered even numbered Fall semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 412L. ECOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 412. The course includes data-gathering in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and mandatory field trips to ecologically important sites. Students will also complete a semester-long project, with the intent to publish results. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 412. Offered in even numbered Fall semesters. One semester; one credit

BIOL 413. PARASITOLOGY
A study of the morphology, taxonomy, life cycle, distribution, pathology, and control of parasites of man and other animals. Alternates with Invertebrate Zoology. Prerequisites: BIOL 112, CHEM 113 or higher, seven additional credits in biology at the 200 level or higher, and Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: BIOL 413L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

BIOL 413L. PARASITOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 413. Students conduct surveys to study the distribution of parasites and conduct long-term studies on the pathology of parasitic infection. Students are required to participate in the Gulf Coast Field trip. Prerequisite: BIOL 112L. Corequisite: BIOL 413. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 414. ANIMAL HISTOLOGY
A study of the microscopic and ultramicroscopic structure of vertebrate (primarily mammalian) tissues and organs, i.e., microscopic anatomy. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function. Group I Biology elective. Prerequisites: BIOL 112, CHEM 113 or higher, seven additional hours of Biology at the 200 level or higher, and Junior or Senior standing. Corequisite: BIOL 414L. Offered in odd numbered Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BIOL 414L. ANIMAL HISTOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 414. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 414. Offered in odd numbered Spring semesters. One semester; one credit

BIOL 415. IMMUNOLOGY
The study of antigens, antibodies, organs and cells involved in humoral and cell-mediated immunity; immunologic techniques are discussed, as well as immune problems such as autoimmunity and AIDS. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and CHEM 212. Recommended: BIOL 311. Corequisite: BIOL 415L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

BIOL 415L. IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 415. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 415. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 421. CELL/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
A study of eukaryotic cell structures and function. Special emphasis is placed on the role that biomolecules play in cell surface interactions that lead to intracellular signaling. The clinical and molecular nature of cancer is also discussed. Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and CHEM 212. Recommended: BIOL 311. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits.

BIOL 421L. CELL/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LABORATORY
Laboratory experiences will demonstrate the concepts covered in BIOL 421. Experiments will employ techniques such as PCR, bacterial transformation, amplification and restriction mapping of plasmid DNA, western blotting and affinity chromatography. Corequisite: BIOL 421. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 430. BIOLOGY OF ZOO ANIMALS
The student will develop a broad understanding of the Phylum Chordata with emphasis on the subphylum Vertebrata. The focus will be on exotic animals and conservation methods associated with them. Lecture topics will include but are not limited to: vertebrate taxonomy and phylogeny, zoological biodiversity, thermoregulation, water balance, reproductive systems, housing and husbandry, nutritional requirements, and US laws and regulations. The course is geared to students who are interested in zoological park careers, animal care and protection, animal management, wildlife management, veterinary medicine, science teaching, or environmental management and protection. Prerequisite: Seven additional credits of biology at the 200 level or higher. One semester; three credits

BIOL 430L. BIOLOGY OF ZOO ANIMALS LABORATORY
The laboratory experience integrates knowledge and application by emphasizing the practical aspects of the care of exotic and domestic vertebrates. Students will conduct library research in aspects of vertebrate families and prepare a species profile. Work at the Memphis Zoo under the guidance of a zoologist and field trips are integral components of the laboratory experience.  One semester; one credit  

BIOL 451. NEUROSCIENCE
This course will investigate the field of neuroscience with emphasis on neuroanatomy of the mammalian brain. Also contained within this course will be the study of neurophysiology and neuropharmacology using both vertebrate and invertebrate central and peripheral nervous systems. Offered in the Spring semester. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor; BIOL 218 or 312 and CHEM 211 or higher. Recommended: CHEM 315. Corequisite: BIOL 451L. One semester; three credits

BIOL 451L. NEUROSCIENCE LABORATORY
This laboratory is designed to complement the Neuroscience lecture course. Neuroanatomy will be taught at both the gross and microscopic level. Experiments and demonstrations will be used to study neurophysiology and neuropharmacology concepts. Corequisite: BIOL 451. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; one credit

BIOL 461. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH I
Under the guidance of a faculty member, senior students design and conduct an organized research project usually requiring 100-150 in-lab hours. Course emphases include experimental design, controls, analysis of results, use of professional literature, and the writing of a draft of a journal-quality paper. Prerequisites: BIOL 362, Permission of the Chair or Course Director, and Senior standing. One semester; one credit

BIOL 462. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH II
A continuation of BIOL 461, the students prepare to present their results in three forms - a final paper, an oral presentation at a public forum, and a poster session on campus. Prerequisites: BIOL 461 and Senior standing. One semester; one credit

BIOL 463. MENTORED RESEARCH I
Research projects are conducted under the guidance of a practicing researcher, generally off campus, but under some circumstances mentored research may be conducted at CBU. Research is performed in the summer preceding the senior year. Mentored Research I usually requires 200-300 in-lab hours. Students are required to attend group discussions and participate in tutorial meetings or correspondence with the course director. Students normally register for Mentored Research I during the summer. Students unable to begin their research during the summer will need permission of the course director to register for Mentored Research I concurrently during the Fall semester. Students are required to take the ETS Biology II exam (BIOL 499) which will be administered in exam week of the Fall semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 362, Senior standing or permission of the instructor. Offered in the Summer and Fall semesters. One semester; one credit

BIOL 464. MENTORED RESEARCH II
This course is a continuation of Mentored Research I. During this course the students will meet weekly to discuss their research results and analyze their data. Project results will be presented in a formal paper by the end of the Fall semester. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 315, CHEM 315L, BIOL 463 and BIOL 499. One semester; two credits

BIOL 465. MENTORED RESEARCH III
During this course, the students will present the results of their work in a public forum as an oral paper and in a poster session on campus. Prerequisite: BIOL 464. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; two credits.

BIOL 490-498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY
Selected topics of interest. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher, seven additional credits of biology at the 200 level or higher;  permission of instructor. One semester; one to four credits

BIOL 490-498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY LAB
Laboratory to accompany BIOL 490-498. Prerequisite: BIOL 112 and CHEM 113 or higher, seven additional credits of biology at the 200 level or higher; permission of instructor. One semester; one to four credits

BIOL 499. SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE
First semester seniors are required to take a comprehensive examination (ETS) on  selected fields of biology. A passing score is required for graduation. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; zero credit


Tentative summer courses  in affiliation with the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL), Ocean Springs, MS: Barrier Island Ecology, Coastal Ornithology Marine Biology, Marine Mammals, Marine Ecology, Marine Conservation, Shark Biology, Oceanography. Marine Ichthyology, Marine Invertebrate Zoology, Marine Aquaculture, Marine Biology, Marine Microbiology.
Oceans and Human Health, Marine Fungi, Marine Toxicology

For additional information about the course offerings at the GCRL, see the Chair of the Biology Department.

back to top