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Bucky and Students

Courses

Global StudiesHistoryPolitical SciencePre-Law

GLOBAL STUDIES

GS 200. FOUNDATIONS OF GLOBAL STUDIES
In this course we will explore the diverse and often conflicting meanings associated with the concept of globalization. We will examine world geography with respect to major regions and consider political, economic, and cultural systems with an eye to what it means in the 21st century to be or become a “global citizen.” The course will be interdisciplinary and will offer the students the opportunity to examine ways to “globalize” their horizons, their major disciplines, and their career paths. (Same as HUM 200). One semester; three credits

GS 300-301. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES
Special topics courses of interest which include some study abroad. Offered as needed. One semester;  one to three credits

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HISTORY

HIST 107. WORLD CIVILIZATIONS TO 1500
This course is an introduction to origins and development of the major world civilizations through the post-classical period. Major topics include the changing status of women, the origins and spread of world religions, the nature and results of cross-cultural encounters, different approaches to understanding the human relationship to the natural world, and the various factors behind the decline and collapse of civilizations. One semester; three credits

HIST 108. WORLD CIVILIZATIONS SINCE 1500
This course is an introduction to the histories of Asia, Europe, Africa, and Latin America since 1500. Major topics include the changing status of women, the origins and effects of Imperialism, the origins and spread of nationalism, the Industrial Revolution, the World Wars, decolonialization, the Cold War, and globalization. One semester; three credits

HIST 151. AMERICAN SOCIETY TO 1877
A survey of Colonial America; the Revolution; Confederation and Constitution; Ante-Bellum Period; the Civil War and Reconstruction. One semester; three credits 

HIST 152. AMERICAN SOCIETY SINCE 1877
A survey of post-Civil War Industrialization and Reform; the Progressive Era; World War I; the Depression and the New Deal; World War II; the Cold War; Recent Developments. One semester; three credits

HIST 200-210. TOPICS IN HISTORY
Topics vary with instructor. Prerequisite: History majors and minors must receive the permission of the department chair and are permitted a maximum of 3 credit hours in this 200 level topics area. One semester; three credits

UPPER DIVISION COURSES ARE OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE MET SPECIFIC COURSE PREREQUISITES.

HIST 301. ANCIENT CIVILIZATION
A study of the origins of civilizations in the Near East and the Mediterranean area: Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Persia, Greece, Rome. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 304.  ENGLAND 1760-1950
This course is a survey of British history from the reign of George III to the establishment of a social welfare state under Clement Atlee. Major topics include the American Revolution, Irish relations, the Napoleonic Wars, Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, and the World Wars. Prerequisite:  HIST 108 or permission of instructor. One semester; three credits.

HIST 305. THE MIDDLE AGES
A political, economic, social, and intellectual history of medieval western civilization. Among other things, the course will cover topics such as the transition from Roman to Medieval civilization, monasticism, feudal society, the religious and intellectual revival of the High Middle Ages, the Papal Monarchy and the Crusades, the Black Death and the transition from Medieval to early modern European civilization. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 306.  SOCIAL HISTORY OF BRITISH ROCK
This course will use readings, lectures, movies, and discussions to examine the connections between British society and the innovative rock music it spawned from the 1950s to the 1990s. Students will discuss the historical context surrounding the creation of music by bands such as The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Clash, The Smiths, Joy Division, Oasis, Blur, and Radiohead. Prerequisite:  HIST 152, 108 or permission of instructor. One semester; three credits.

HIST 313. BRITISH INDIA
The history of British India from the founding of the East India Company in 1600 to partition and the transfer of power in 1947.  The main focus will be on the encounter between the British and the Indians, but we will also explore the process of British conquest, the development of colonial policy and imperial ideology, the various forms of Indian reaction and resistance, and the origins and growth of the independence movement. Prerequisite HIST 108 or permission of the instructor.  One semester; three credits

HIST 315. MODERN EAST ASIA
This course examines the history of China and Japan since 1800.  Particular attention is given to the reaction to Western Imperialism and each country’s development into a modern nation.  Prerequisite: HIST 108 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 324. SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION
This course is an examination of the origins and development of the scientific revolution in Europe from 1450 to 1750.  The course focuses on the social and cultural forces that shaped the scientific revolution as well as the revolution’s broad impact beyond the world of science.  The lives and accomplishments of famous scientists, such as Galileo and Newton, will also be covered.  Prerequisite: HIST 108 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 336. EUROPE AND AFRICA, 1830-1970
This course explores the motiviations behind European imperialism in Africa, colonization, decolonization, and the impract of these events on European and African society, politics, and culture. Prerequisite: HIST 108 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 339. EUROPE AND THE GREAT WAR
This course details the history of World War One with a focus on the war’s causes and its cultural and social impact within Europe.  It will also examine the course of the fighting and major military and political personalities.  Prerequisite:  HIST 108 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 340. WEIMAR REPUBLIC AND NAZI GERMANY
This course covers the history of Germany from 1919 to 1945.  It will examine the collapse of the Weimar Republic and the rise of Nazi power.  It will also cover the life of Adolf Hitler, the Holocaust, and Nazi ideology, policy, and war aims. Prerequisite: Any Political Science or History course or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 341. REVOLUTIONARY CHANGE IN MODERN EUROPE
This course explores the history of modern Europe through a comparative study of  the French and Russian Revolutions. Prerequisite: HIST 108 or permission of the instructor One semester; three credits

HIST 342. COLONIAL AMERICA
A study of primarily British North America from settlement to 1763 with some discussion of Spanish, French and Indian cultures. Prerequisite: HIST 151 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 343. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD
A study of the origins, causes, and results of the American Revolution; the Confederation Period; the Constitutional Convention; the early years of the new nation; emphasis on the emergence of political parties and the Jefferson Presidency. Prerequisite: HIST 151 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 345. THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH
The study of social, cultural, economic, and political developments in the antebellum South. Prerequisite: HIST 151 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 346. THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION
An examination of the causes of the Civil War; a comparison of the Union and the Confederacy; military phases of the War; emphasis on Lincoln and Davis; aftermath of the Civil War and the role of the Radical Republicans. Prerequisite: HIST 151 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 347. EMERGENCE OF MODERN AMERICA
A political, economic, social, and diplomatic history of America from the end of Reconstruction to the Great Depression. Prerequisite: HIST 152 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 348. MODERN AMERICA
A political, economic, social, and diplomatic history of America from the Great Depression to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 152 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 349. THE SOUTH SINCE RECONSTRUCTION
A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the  former Confederate and slave states since 1877. Prerequisite: HIST 152 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 350. HONORS AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY
Social, cultural, economic, and political role of African-Americans in the United States from 1619 to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 151, 152, Membership in Honors Program or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 351. HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN WEST
This course covers the history of the trans-Mississippi West during the nineteenth century, examining the region’s geography, as well as, describing its impact on American history until the symbolic “closing of the frontier” in the 1890s and beyond. As an examination of this distinctive part of American history and culture, this course will also focus on the mythology of the West and the creation of some of America’s most lasting and important imagery, especially in movies, music, and literature. Prerequisite: HIST 151, 152, or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits 

HIST 375. UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY
This course will examine the history and practice of U.S. foreign policy. It will examine current issues in U.S. foreign policy, the organization and function of institutions, how decisions are made, and the politics of foreign policy making. Prerequisite: any political science or history course or permission of the instructor. Recommended but not required, one of the following: HIST 152 or POLS 112 or POLS 113. (Same as POLS 375) One semester; three credits

HIST 376. MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, AND THE CARIBBEAN
A political, military, and cultural history of three important regions of Latin America. This course will examine the course and impact of European conquest, the role of colonial institutions, and independence movements.  The greatest attention will be paid to twentieth-century events and trends, in order to analyze their influence on contemporary societies in these areas. Prerequisite: HIST 108 or permission of the instructor.  One semester; three credits

HIST 377. REVOLUTIONARY LATIN AMERICA
This course will examine the role of revolutions throughout nineteenth and twentieth century Latin America.  The focus of the course will be on political and military events, as well as the theory behind revolutionary activity.  Careful attention will be paid to revolutions in Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Nicaragua, and El Salvador.  Prerequisite: HIST 108 or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 385-389. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NON-WESTERN HISTORY
Topics vary with instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 390-399. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in history open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of instructor and Honors Director. One semester; one to four credits

HIST 401-402. INTERNSHIP
Content varies with specific internship program. Prerequisites: permission of History Internship Director and Junior standing. One semester each; one to three credits

HIST 490-497. TOPICS IN HISTORY
Topics vary with instructor. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 498.  NON-US HISTORY RESEARCH SEMINAR
Non-US topics vary with instructor but will focus on research methods and the completion of a major research project.   Each course will be based on a common theme or time period, with students developing their own research project related to the common course theme or period.  As part of the writing and research process students will deliver 20 minute presentations of their research. All history majors are required to pass this course or HIST 499 with a minimum grade of a C.  Prerequisites: 12 hours of history credit and Senior standing, or Junior standing with permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

HIST 499. US HISTORY RESEARCH SEMINAR
US topics vary with instructor but will focus on research methods and the completion of a major research project.   Each course will be based on a common theme or time period, with students developing their own research project related to the common course theme or period.  As part of the writing and research process students will deliver 20 minute presentations of their research.  All history majors are required to pass this course or HIST 498 with a minimum grade of a C.  Prerequisites: 12 hours of history credit and Senior standing, or Junior standing with permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 112. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
This course is a survey of the American political system. Topics include the Constitution, federalism, interaction between the three branches of the federal government (legislative, executive, and judicial), political actors outside government (interest groups, media, political parties), state and local government, political culture, civil liberties, civil rights, and public policy. Offered in the Fall and Spring. No prerequisite. One semester; three credits

POLS 113. WORLD POLITICS
This course examines how politics unfold at the global level. Special attention will be paid to global actors and institutions: nations-states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and multi-national corporations.  Topics include: conflict and cooperation, terrorism, the world economy, the environment, international law, and the interplay of culture, ideology, technology, and geography. No prerequisite. One semester; three credits

POLS 115. NATIONS AND STATES (Comparative Politics) (Formerly POLS 210)
Comparing nation-states from different regions of the world through an examination of their politics, governments, economic systems, and cultures.  The course will include discussion of democratic and non-democratic regimes, and different constitutional models.  It shall also explore the role of culture, history, ideology, religion, and geography in shaping political systems.  No prerequisite.  One semester; three credits 

POLS 200-205. SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
Topics vary with instructor. No prerequisite. One semester; one to three credits

POLS 215. INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW
This course is intended to introduce the student to the American legal system and to various practice areas of the law. Topics discussed include: how (and why) the American legal system is organized, including how the legislative process and executive branch are involved in this system; the focus on the role of ethics, procedure, and jurisdiction in the law; and an introduction to the primary substantive areas of the law that first year law students encounter, including torts, family, estate, property, contracts, business, and criminal law. (Same as PREL 215). No prerequisite. One semester; three credits

POLS 220. SCIENCE FICTION AND POLITICS
The examination of political and social themes in works of science fiction and fantasy.  The focus of the course will be the critical reading of texts, both written works and film.  Issues discussed include: identity, the Self and the Other, conflict and war, the organization of society, utopia/anti-utopia, and the relationship between technology and culture. No prerequisite. One semester; three credits

POLS 230. SURVEY OF POLITICS ON FILM
A survey of film as a vehicle for the communication of ideas and as an art form. The critical analysis of film as a political text. The way in which political and social issues are depicted in film. Other issues discussed include prejudice and stereotyping in film, propaganda, and film censorship. No Prerequisite. One semester; three credits.

UPPER DIVISION COURSES ARE OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE SOPHOMORE STANDING AND MEET SPECIFIC COURSE PREREQUISITES, IF ANY.

POLS 330. ADVANCED POLITICS ON FILM
A concentrated critical analysis of the political aspects of film, the politics of film production, and the interpretation of film. This course shall focus on a particular political or social issue, topic, or film genre. Prerequisite: Any Political Science or History course or permission of the instructor Recommended but not required: POLS 230. One semester; three credits.

POLS 340. WEIMAR REPUBLIC AND NAZI GERMANY
This course covers the history of Germany from 1919 to 1945.  It will examine the collapse of the Weimar Republic and the rise of Nazi power.  It will also cover the life of Adolf Hitler, the Holocaust, and Nazi ideology, policy, and war aims.  Prerequisite: Any Political Science or History course or permission of the instructor.  (Same as HIST 340) One semester, three credits

POLS 370. INTERNATIONAL LAW
The history, formation and application of international law. Issues discussed include the sources of international law, the law of treaties, and rules regarding diplomacy, human rights, war/peace, war crimes, nationality, territory, and the global commons. Course readings shall include both secondary sources and legal texts. Prerequisites: Any political science or history course, or GS/HUM 200 or permission of the instructor. Recommended, but not required: POLS 113. One semester; three credits

POLS 375. UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY
(Same as HIST 375). Prerequisite: any political science or history course or Permission of the instructor. Recommended, but not required, one of the following: HIST 152 or POLS 112 or POLS 113. One semester; three credits.

POLS 390-399. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS
Special topics in political science open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor and Honors Director. Topics vary with instructor. One semester; three credits

POLS 401. U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
An examination of the structure of U.S. government and the limits on governmental power through detailed analysis of the U.S. Constitution and Supreme Court decisions interpreting it. The course will also examine the appropriate scope of judicial review in a democratic society. Prerequisite: POLS 112 or HIST 151 or permission of the department head. One semester; three credits

POLS 470-479. TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
Topics vary with instructor. Prerequisite: Any political science or history course, or permission of instructor. One semester each; one to three credits each

POL 490-499. INTERNSHIPS
Content varies with specific internship program. Prerequisite: Permission of Political Science Internship Director. One semester each; one to three credits

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PRE-LAW

PREL 215 INTRODUCTION TO THE LAW
This course is intended to introduce the student to the American legal system and to various practice areas of the law. Topics discussed include: how (and why) the American legal system is organized, including how the legislative process and executive branch are involved in this system; the focus on the role of ethics, procedure, and jurisdiction in the law; and an introduction to the primary substantive areas of the law that first year law students encounter, including torts, family, estate, property, contracts, business, and criminal law. (Same as POLS 215). No prerequisite. One semester; three credits.

PREL 216. PRE-LAW PRACTICUM
The Pre-Law Practicum will prepare students for the challenges of law students. The emphasis will be on personal statement preparation, LSAT preparation, and the application process. No prerequisite. One semester; one credit

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