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Courses

Computer ScienceMathematics

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 171. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (Formerly CS 109)
This course concerns elementary algorithms and programming. Topics include an overview of computer hardware and software, system architecture, data representation, basic data structures, Boolean logic, digital circuit design, discovery and expression of algorithms, implementation and efficiency of algorithms, programming and control structures and basic UNIX commands. It uses a Java based language for programming exercises. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

CS 172. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE (Formerly CS 122)
This course concerns more topics in algorithms and program development using object-oriented programming concepts. Topics include methods, arrays, classes, objects, encapsulation, inheritance, composition, abstraction and graphical user interfaces. It uses the Java language for programming exercises and projects. Prerequisite: CS 171, ECE 101 or MATH 117, 129, or 131. Corequisite: CS 172L Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

CS 172L. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE LAB (Formerly CS 122L)
Lab to accompany CS 172. Corequisite: CS 172L. One semester; one credit

CS 234. DATA STRUCTURES
The course teaches the student important data structures, such as lists, stacks, queues, trees and tables.  The student designs and implements correct readable and efficient software systems with interacting components. Prerequisite: CS 172. Corequisite: CS 234L. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

CS 234L. DATA STRUCTURES LAB
Lab to accompany CS 234. Corequisite: CS 234. One semester; one credit

CS 240. INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS (Same as BIOL 240)
Prerequisite: CS 172.

CS 301. C PROGRAMMING
The course discusses problem solving and the design of algorithms and their implementation in the C programming language. It considers the fundamentals of procedural programming with applications in business, engineering and science. Topics include variables, expressions and statements, console input/output, modularization and functions, arrays, pointers and strings, data structures, and file input/output. Its laboratories require designing and implementing applications. Prerequisites: CS 234. One semester; two credits

CS 360. OBJECT ORIENTED DESIGN
The course uses object oriented analysis and design techniques and tools to develop and implement solutions to problems in business, engineering and science. Prerequisite: CS 234. Offered in the Spring semester One semester; three credits

CS 370. OPERATING SYSTEMS (Formerly CS 380)
This course presents the topics that govern the behavior of operating systems. Topics include processor scheduling, memory management, input, output, file storage allocation, protection and security. Prerequisite: CS 234 or ECE 235. Same as CS 370. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits.

CS 400. INTERNSHIP IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Computer science majors receive on-the-job training in the offices of cooperating firms. To receive credit, the student must submit periodic reports and a detailed final report of the work done. The authorized supervisor at the firm must verify these reports. Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of the Computer Science faculty. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; one to three credits

CS 440. ALGORITHMS
The course studies standard methods and examples in the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include some basic paradigms in algorithm design and analysis of the efficiency and optimality of representative algorithms selected from some of graph, pattern matching, numerical, randomized and approximation algorithms. Offered in the Spring semester of even numbered years. Prerequisites: MATH 141 or 405 and CS 234. One semester; three credits

CS 460-469. TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Courses are designed each semester to meet the current needs of the students and to express the particular interests of the instructor. Prerequisite: CS/ECE 360. Offered in the Spring semester of odd numbered years. One semester; one to three credits

CS 471. DATABASE DESIGN
The course stresses the design of databases and their implementation using a relational database management system.  Topics include entity-relationship and relational data models and database design.  Abstract query languages (relational algebra) and SQL (language for creating, querying, and modifying relational and object-relational databases). Views, integrity, constraints, triggers, transactions and security. Data warehouses, data mining, temporal databases, XML. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Offered in the Fall semester. Same as ECE 471. One semester; three credits

CS 481. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECT I
The course requires that the student design, develop and implement a major project that solves a real problem in either business or engineering in the field of computer science. The project requires the presentation of oral and written reports. Prerequisites: CS/ECE 360 and Senior standing. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

CS 482. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECT II
The course is a continuation of CS 481. The student completes the project begun in CS 481 and must pass a departmental assessment test. The student may have to take an external assessment examination approved by the department. Prerequisite or corequisite: CS 481. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

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MATHEMATICS

MATH 103. FUNDAMENTALS OF ALGEBRA
The course is designed to give the student fundamental quantitative and algebraic skills needed in other mathematics and science courses. Topics include: equations and inequalities, absolute value, linear systems, exponents, factoring, rational expressions, rational exponents, quadratic equations, and functions. The course does not supply any portion of the mathematics credits required in any CBU degree program. Students may not receive credit for MATH 103 after completing any mathematics course numbered above 103. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra and passing a placement exam. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

MATH 105. FINITE MATH 
This course contains introductory topics in mathematics for students in arts and business. Topics include lines, linear systems, matrices, linear programming, functions, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic models, and financial math. Prerequisites: MATH 103, ALG 120, or passing a placement exam. See Math Center Web page. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

MATH 106. APPLIED MATH WITH AN INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS
This course contains introductory topics in mathematics for students in arts and business. Topics include: functions; graphs; linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic models; introduction to differential and integral calculus. A student can receive credit for only one of MATH 106 or MATH 131.  Prerequisite: MATH 105 or MATH 117. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

MATH 107. FUNCTIONS
The course covers the basic concepts of college algebra, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as their graphs. The course emphasizes a comprehensive understanding of the language and uses of functions. Through the study of functions and their inverses, the course stresses algebraic skills and problem solving. Prerequisite:  ALG 120 or Math 103 or equivalent. Two credits

MATH 110. TRIGONOMETRY 
The goals of the course are to teach the student basic concepts of trigonometry and trigonometric functions and its applications. Topics include: Review of functions and their inverses, right triangle trigonometry; trigonometric functions and their inverses; trigonometric identities; Law of Sines and Cosines. The course requires a graphing calculator and stresses problem solving. A grade of “C” or better in this course is required to proceed to Math 131. A student can receive credits for only one of Math 110 or Math 117 or Math 129. Prerequisite: Math 107 or equivalent. Two credits

MATH 117. PRECALCULUS
The goals of the course are to teach the student the basic concepts of college algebra, linear equations, quadratic equations, word problems, functions, graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry and trigonometric functions. The course stresses problem solving by the student with the use of a graphing calculator. A student can receive credit for only one of MATH 110, 117 or 129. A grade of “C” or better in this course is required to proceed to MATH 131. Prerequisite: MATH 103, 107 or ALG 120 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

MATH 121. STATISTICS INTRODUCTION
This is an independent study statistics module that includes percentages, measures of central tendency, dispersion, graphic representation of data, and estimation of parameters. Successful completion fulfills the statistics outcome of the General Education Requirements. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester; zero credits

MATH 129. FUNCTIONS AND ENGINEERING CALCULUS I
The goals of this course are to teach the student basic concepts of college algebra and trigonometry and important concepts of calculus and its applications. Topics include: linear and quadratic equations; algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs; right triangle trigonometry; trigonometric functions; the derivative and its interpretations; the definite integral and its interpretations; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; rules of differentiation and integration; and applications of derivatives and integrals. The course requires a graphing calculator and stresses problem solving. A student can receive credit for only one of MATH 110, 117 or 129 and for only one of MATH 129 or MATH 131. Six lectures and two recitation periods per week. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or 107 or equivalent. Offered in the Fall. One semester; six credits

MATH 131. CALCULUS I
The goals of the course are to teach the student important concepts of calculus and its applications. Topics include functions, the derivative and its interpretations, the definite integral and its interpretations, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative and antiderivatives. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. A student can receive credit for only one of MATH 129 or 131. Prerequisite: MATH 110 with a grade of “C” or better, or MATH 117 with a grade of “C” or better. This prerequisite is waived for a student who passes a departmental placement test. A grade of “C” or better in this course is required to proceed to MATH 132. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

MATH 132. CALCULUS II
The goals of the course are to teach the student additional important concepts of calculus begun in MATH 131. Topics include techniques of integration, applications of integration, differential equations and modeling, approximations using Taylor and Fourier polynomials and series. Prerequisite: MATH 129 or MATH 131 with a grade of “C” or better. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

MATH 141. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
This course considers a variety of discrete mathematical themes and subjects. These themes include problem solving, abstraction, representation, mathematical reasoning and proof, recursion, induction, modeling and synthesis. Topics include logic, graphs, sets, algorithms and combinatorics. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or 106 or 117 or 129 or 131. Offered in odd numbered Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MATH 151. NUMERICAL CONCEPTS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
This course includes concepts essential to mathematics for elementary school teaching candidates. Topics include: set theory, numbers and numeration, number theory, rational numbers, and problem solving. This course does not meet the CBU General Education Math requirement. Prerequisite: ALG 120 or equivalent. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

MATH 152. MATH TOPICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
This course includes concepts essential to mathematics for elementary school teaching candidates. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course does not meet the CBU General Education Math requirement: Prerequisite: ALG 120 or equivalent. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

MATH 162. HEALTH SCIENCE APPLICATIONS OF ALGEBRA AND STATISTICS
The course uses models appropriate to the health sciences to motivate the study of algebra and statistics. Topics are chosen from algebraic expressions, symbol manipulation, linear and quadratic equations, descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, the normal distribution, functions, graphs, and linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic models. The course stresses interpretation of the mathematical model in its diverse applications. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or equivalent and admission to RN to BSN program. One semester; three credits

MATH 201. APPLIED STATISTICS
The course concerns the use of statistical methodology in planning, presentation, analysis and interpretation of scientific experiments and field observations. Topics are chosen from elements of probability and statistical inference, including estimates of parameters, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses for quantitative and qualitative observations, correlation, nonparametric methods. Its goal is to allow science majors to analyze real data in a correct statistical manner. Offered in the Spring semester. Prerequisite: MATH 106, 129 or 131. One semester; three credits

MATH 231. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
This course is an introduction to the concepts and methods of ordinary differential equations. Topics include: first-order equations, elementary numerical methods, qualitative analysis, second-order homogeneous linear equations, the methods of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters for nonhomogeneous equations, Laplace transforms, and models in science and engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 132. Offered in the Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MATH 232. CALCULUS III
Algebra of vectors in a plane and in space; the calculus of vectors; vector functions; basic concepts of multivariable calculus; partial derivatives; multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 231. Offered in the Fall and Spring. One semester; three credits

MATH 301. GEOMETRY AND HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS
The course contains topics in geometry and the history of mathematics. Topics include Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, mathematical structures and the historical development of mathematical concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 132. Offered in odd numbered Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

MATH 308. STATISTICS
The course considers statistical methods with applications in engineering and science. Topics are selected from an introduction to probability, descriptive statistics, sampling methods, design of statistical experiments, concepts of hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, correlation, linear regression and analysis of variance. Offered in the Spring semester. Prerequisite: MATH 232. One semester; three credits

MATH 309. PROBABILITY
The course considers fundamental topics in probability with applications in engineering and science. Topics are selected from: basic concepts in probability, random variables, expectation, variance, covariance, moment generating functions, common distributions such as binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, geometric, uniform, normal, exponential, chi-square, T and F distributions, probability models, central limit theorem and functions of a random variable, bivariate, marginal, and conditional distributions. Offered in the Fall semester. Prerequisite: MATH 232. One semester; three credits

MATH 329. APPLIED NUMERICAL ANALYSIS
The course teaches the student the basic techniques of modeling and numerical computation with emphasis on applications and the use of numerical software. Topics will be chosen from the following: modeling of physical systems with algebraic, differential and integral techniques; algorithms for approximation; fitting functions to data; algorithms for the solution of linear systems and for finding eigenvalues and eigenvectors; algorithms for the solution of differential and integral equations; Fourier transforms. Offered in the Fall semester. Prerequisite: MATH 232 and a computer language. One semester; three credits

MATH 401. LINEAR ALGEBRA
This course contains an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra; namely Gaussian elimination, the theory of simultaneous linear equations, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and linear transformations. The course includes applications of linear algebra to selected topics from engineering, biology, and business. Prerequisite: MATH 232. Offered in odd numbered Fall semesters. One semester; three credits

MATH 402. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA
The course contains an introduction to some basic concepts of abstract algebra, namely groups, rings, and fields and includes applications. Prerequisite: MATH 232. Offered in the Spring semester of even numbered years. One semester; three credits

MATH 405. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
This course is an introduction to graph theory and combinatorics. The topics will be chosen from the following: the basic properties of graphs and digraphs, graphs as models, Eulerian and Hamiltonian circuits, graph coloring, trees, network algorithms, generating functions, and recurrence relations. Prerequisite: MATH 231. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

MATH 413. COMPLEX ANALYSIS (Formerly MATH 403)
This course concerns itself with the rudiments and techniques of complex analysis. Topics that are covered include: complex sequences, the derivative of a complex function, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, integration in the complex plane and the Cauchy-Goursat theorem, Cauchy’s integral formula, Morera’s theorem, Taylor and Laurent series, residue theory, and the evaluation of definite integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 232. Offered in the Fall semester of even numbered years. One semester; three credits

MATH 414. REAL ANALYSIS (Formerly MATH 302)
The course develops the theory of calculus. It stresses the proofs of the theorems for functions of one variable. Topics include sequences, series, functions, limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 232. Offered in the Spring semester of odd numbered years. One semester; three credits

MATH 470-479. TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS
This course is designed to meet the current needs of the students and to express the particular interests of the instructor. Prerequisites: Junior standing, MATH 232 and Permission of instructor. One semester; one to three credits 

MATH 481-482. SENIOR SEMINAR I AND II
The student conducts an independent investigation in some field of mathematics. The course requires both written and oral reports. In addition, the student must pass a comprehensive assessment test in mathematics. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and approval of the department head. Offered in sequence in the Fall and Spring. One semester each; one and two credits respectively. 

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