Articles & Advice

chess10 Ways To Network Your Way To A New Job
From Careerealism

Getting a job can be a major challenge, especially if it is your first job or you’re over 50.

Think of the job market in your area and how many people will be applying for a job listed on an online job board or local newspaper. All applicants are your competitors for the prized job. How will you give yourself the best chance of success in finding a job? How do you stand out from the crowd? How can you get the inside running?

EVERY person you know could become your sponsor, supporter, and a referrer for the opportunity you want. Consider the following to help you network your way to a new job: Read More…


businesscardThe Non-Boring Way To Show Off Your Soft Skills In Your Job Search
From Forbes

Have you ever described yourself on your resume or in your cover letter as a “hard worker” with a “positive attitude” who is able to “learn quickly?” Let me guess—did your job application seem to disappear into the HR black hole? I can’t say I’m surprised.

Here’s why. While the prevalence of applicant tracking systems, which match up job applications with the skills listed in the job description, has grown, in the end there’s still a human doing the final screening. And humans don’t connect with a series of keywords—they connect with good stories.

In other words, don’t sell yourself short by just throwing in flat, overused words to describe your soft skills. Show them off in a more concrete way, and I guarantee you’ll have more success.  Here’s how to do it—in every aspect of your job search.  Read more…


talking14 Interview Questions That Are Designed To Trick You
From AOL Careers

Savvy hiring managers have honed their ability to ask the least amount of questions yielding the greatest depth of information. One way they do this is by asking seemingly simple questions that get you to reveal information you may have been trying to conceal. In other words: questions designed to trick you.

“To uncover areas that may reflect inconsistencies, hiring managers sometimes ask these tricky questions,” says Tina Nicolai, executive career coach and founder of Resume Writers’ Ink.

Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job,” says they use these queries to break through the “traditional interview noise and clutter,” and to get to the “raw you.”  Read More…