CBU CareerLinX Recruitment System Q&A

CareerLinx_shortI see “CareerLinX” mentioned in this newsletter all the time.  What the heck is that exactly?

CareerLinX is the recruitment system software used by CBU Career Services.  First used by CBU in 2009 (formerly called “NaceLink”), this system allows CBU students and alumni to view jobs, internships, and other opportunities posted by local and national employers!  Most jobs are posted by employers who we’ve worked with for years, and who are specifically looking for a CBU student or alumnus to fit the bill!

There are lots of other things you can do with CareerLinX, too (load resumes and cover letters, RSVP to workshops, etc.), but the main goal is to help you more easily interface with recruiters who are looking for someone just like you!

Do I already have an account?

If you were enrolled at the beginning of the year, then yes, you should already have an account!  All current students automatically get an account as in-coming freshmen…and it lasts in perpetuity!   So if you missed the “System Welcome” message that was sent with your username and password, your account is still waiting for you!

If you’re an alumnus, or a new student who still needs an account, then you can sign up for an account at any time.  You can set your username and password to whatever you prefer (neither your CBU email nor your “899″ number are required as part of registration.)

How do I log in to CareerLinX?

Easy!  Just click here.  If you’ve not used your account before now, then your default username is your CBU email address.  Just keep in mind that your default password is NOT the same as your CBU email password.  CareerLinX is a stand-alone system (not part of your email, or Banner, or MyCBU), so the initial password is different from any others you may use.  If you already have an account, just use the “forgot password” link to reset it.  You can then change it to whatever you want!

What is the first thing I should do when I’m logged in?

As mentioned above, there are a lot of things you can do with CareerLinX.  But the first thing you’ll want to do is update your profile in the “profile” tab.  You can share as much or as little information as you want, but there are a few very important things to keep current…such as your major, your class year, and your anticipated graduation date.  These elements are the objective criteria that can effect your ability to view and/or apply for certain jobs, so be sure to update them at least once every semester…keeping that info current is VERY important.

Once you update your profile, we encourage you to explore all the other things you can do with CareerLinX.  If you have any questions or get stuck at any point, don’t hesitate to contact Curt Rogers in Career Services:  crogers@cbu.edu.

Articles & Advice

blunder_crop380w[1]Five Common Fears Of Recent Grads
From Careerealism

Life can slap you in the face once you’ve left college. Suddenly, you’ve got real commitments to keep and deadlines to make, you can’t skip classes just because you partied too hard on Tuesday night.  And spending every day in sweatpants? Fo’get about it. Sounds pretty dull, huh? But it doesn’t have to be! Here are some solutions for these common fears of recent grads.  Read More…


laptop10 Tips For Better  Business Writing
From Forbes

The growing ubiquity of e-mail means that everyone in business, from lords of finance to programmers who dream in code, needs to write intelligently. By using simple, clear, precise language–and following a few other basic writing rules–you can become a better communicator and improve the prospects for your career.

“Clarity is the most important characteristic of good business writing,” says Mignon Fogarty, creator of the “Grammar Girl Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing” podcast. “Often businesspeople will use big $10 words because they want to sound intelligent. Instead, they end up sounding like they’re trying too hard.”  Read more…


nonprofitThe Five Most Gut-Wrenching Work Moments – And How To Survive Them
From TheDailyMuse.com

No matter how much you love your job, stress at work is inevitable. In fact, job pressure is the top cause of stress for Americans, according to a 2013 American Institute of Stress study. But how you handle yourself under pressure or in a bad situation speaks volumes about your promotability and leadership potential.

From a last-minute deadline to serious department budget cuts, here are five stressful work situations, plus effective coping strategies that’ll keep your job and your sanity intact.  Read More…

6 Tips For Avoiding The Resume Black Hole

talkingFrom Forbes.com (2/4/2013)

Many job seekers spend countless hours writing, polishing and blasting their resumes to dozens of companies. Then they wait, and wait, and never hear a thing. That’s because human resources people and hiring managers receive heaps of resumes for any given job opening, and they end up missing, skipping or tossing a lot of them.

However, it turns out there are things you can do to help ensure your resume is seen.  Read the full article from Forbes.com…

Hidden Secrets Of A Young Professional

computerFrom Early Careerist (2/7/2013) – By Chrisina Kach

Have you ever wondered if there is more behind successful individuals than the typical advice you see in most publications on developing your brand and career.  The answer is yes; successful individuals have figured out tangible actions to supplement those pieces of advice and supplement their work performance.

Today I am going to share a few of the less obvious pieces of advice I’ve accrued over the years as a young professional that have helped me gain traction in my career.  Read the full article from EarlyCareerist.com…

Job Applications Require Your Best Efforts

importantFrom FederalTimes.com (2/4/2013) 

The 17th-century French scientist and mathematician Blaise Pascal said, “If I had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.” The principle that writing concise documents takes more time than writing long-winded ones applies to just about every type of document, including reports, fact sheets, websites, letters, presentations and applications.

Instead of leaving the preparation of documents to the last minute, take time to:  Read the full article from FederalTimes.com…

College Seniors: The Time To Find A Job Is Now!

imageFrom LinkedIn.com (2/4/2013)

It’s only early February, but if this is your (or your son’s or daughter’s) last year of college, it’s time to get the job search in full gear. Here are ways to increase your odds of success.

First, let’s be clear. Your goal isn’t to get a job this month, but rather to lay the groundwork so that you’ll have a great job when you graduate. Start conversations, not interviews: Before you get interviews or offers, you need to start interacting with people who are already in the workforce. Reach out and have intelligent conversations with them.   Read the full article from LinkedIn…

How To Cover Up Your Lack Of Work Experience

professionalimageFrom Early Careerist (1/23/2013)

Cover-ups happen all the time. For years, people have been trying to conceal the truth about alien encounters, square planets, and dinosaur amusement parks. But the greatest smokescreen of all time has nothing to do with grassy knolls or UFOs.

No, it’s that you can cover up your lack of work experience and actually get a job, make money, and get some of that pesky experience that’s been causing you so much grief. Read on to learn the best ways to overcome your inexperience and get that job you’ve been hoping for.   Read the full article from EarlyCareerist.com…

Three Things That Will Get Your Resume Thrown In The Trash

icon_interview1From TheDailyMuse.com (1/20/2013) 

You know all about getting your resume noticed. (Clean layout! Accomplishments, not duties!) But do you know what’s on the flipside? What you might be doing that could cause recruiters to overlook your resume—or worse, toss it in the trash? Gasp! The trash? I know what you’re thinking, but the truth is, recruiters have dozens, even hundreds, of resumes to comb through every day.

So, in an effort to cull them down to a reasonable amount, they’ll simply toss any that don’t meet what they’re looking for. To learn more, I sat down with a few recruiters and asked them about the resumes that make the cut and those that get tossed. Here are three of their deal-breakers.  Read the full article from TheDailyMuse.com…