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Courses

Humanities PhilosophyReligious Studies


HUMANITIES

HUM 150. PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC LIFE
This course will examine what it has meant throughout history and in different cultures to be a member of a society. Students will learn about and critically analyze the role of the individual in civil society from depictions in history, literature, religion, philosophy, and the fine arts. A key aim of the course is to provide students with essential insight into the opportunities and justification for lives of community involvement. One semester; three credits 

HUM 160. HONORS PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC LIFE
This honors seminar will examine what it has meant throughout history and in different cultures to be a member of society. The primary focus will be on the role of the individual in civil society as depicted in history, literature, religion, philosophy, and the fine arts. Students will be required to complete a service learning project and follow-up paper/class presentation in which opportunities and justifications for lives of community involvement are explored. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program. One semester; three credits

HUM 200. FOUNDATIONS OF GLOBAL STUDIES
In this course we will explore the diverse and often conflicting meanings associated with the concept of globalization. We will examine world geography with respect to major regions and consider political, economic, and cultural systems with an eye to what it means in the 21st century to be or become a “global citizen.” The course will be interdisciplinary and will offer the students the opportunity for students to examine ways to “globalize” their horizons, their major disciplines, and their career paths. (Same as GS 200) One semester; three credits

HUM 210. INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY
This class will use common texts, discussions, collaborative activity, and field trips to explore the meanings of environmental and community sustainability from multiple cultural and academic perspectives. Guest speakers fromlocal community organizations and businesses as well as CBU professors from different departments will engage students with what sustainability means in their professional and civic activity. Students will collaborate as a class or work in groups to design a project that achieves sustainability-related outcomes. One semester; three credits.

HUM 254. CHRISTIANITY AND PEACE (Formerly HUM 354)
(Same as RS 254) One semester; three credits

HUM 295, 395. COMMUNITY SERVICE
A structured opportunity for students to select and participate in a community service project in the Memphis area. Includes regular meetings with the faculty advisor, group meetings for reflection and discussion. Normally involves a minimum of 60 hours of service. One semester; three credits

HUM 306. COMPUTERS AND SOCIETY
An examination of the social implications of computer technology and of the special social and ethical issues raised by the growing use of computers in all aspects of human life, including business and finance, science, education, government, etc. Among topics considered will be privacy and security, quality of work life, the potentials and problems of computer modeling, information systems and artificial intelligence, and the responsibilities of computer professionals and others for the use of computers. One semester; three credits

HUM 498. HONORS CAPSTONE
As a required capstone experience, each Honors student will participate in the Honors Capstone in either the Junior or Senior year. Using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing upon a special topic or theme that can vary from year to year, students will critically reflect upon their academic major and previous Honors courses in the context of broader moral visions and public commitments. One semester; three credits

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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 201. INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC
A study of valid and fallacious reasoning, deductive and inductive. Formal logical structures such as the syllogism will be examined, as well as the logic of ordinary discourse and the avoidance of “informal” fallacies. One semester; three credits.

PHIL 219. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
A philosophical investigation into basic questions of politics and society and the moral foundations of human social existence. Topics may include human rights, equality, distributive justice, authority, punishment and coercion, and the nature of the good or just society. (Same as CJ 219) (PHIL 219 satisfies the  “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 220. CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES
A philosophical examination of a number of significant and controversial contemporary moral problems. Topics will vary but may include abortion, capital punishment, sexual morality, animal rights, environmental ethics, freedom of speech, discrimination, and affirmative action. The treatment of these topics will develop in the context of the tradition of philosophical ethics. (PHIL 220 satisfies the  “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 223. BUSINESS ETHICS (formerly PHIL 323)
An analysis of business ethics, the responsibilities of business firms to employees, owners, consumers, and society. PHIL 223 satisfies the “Moral Values” general education requirement. One semester; three credits

PHIL 224. THEORIES OF HUMAN NATURE
An examination of several major theories of human nature with special emphasis on the ethical implications of these theories. A consideration of such questions as whether humans are by nature either good or evil, individual or social, free or determined in their actions, and whether they have some natural purpose or end. (PHIL 224 satisfies the  “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 234. HONORS THEORIES OF HUMAN NATURE
An intensive study of classical, modern, and postmodern theories of human nature through the reading of original texts. There will be an emphasis on the philosophical concepts and the ethical implications of the theories. Prerequisite: Membership in Honors Program. (PHIL 234 satisfies the  “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 280-289. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY
Special topics in philosophy open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. One  semester; one to four credits.

PHIL 317. ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
An in-depth treatment of selected philosophers from the ancient and medieval periods including Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisites: sophomore standing or higher. One semester; three credits

PHIL 318. MODERN PHILOSOPHY
An in-depth treatment of selected philosophers from the 17th to the 19th centuries, beginning with Descartes. Does not presuppose PHIL 317. Prerequisites: sophomore standing or higher. One semester; three credits

PHIL 320. CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY
An introduction to the major currents of 20th Century philosophical thought in America and Europe. The focus will be on the question of the meaning of subjective existence. Answers to this question will be examined from the perspectives of analytic philosophy, pragmatism, existentialism, and contemporary continental thought. Prerequisites: sophomore standing or higher. One semester; three credits

PHIL 322. MEDICAL ETHICS
A review and evaluation of various theories of moral philosophy and an investigation into some of the current moral issues in the fields of biology and medicine. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher.  (PHIL 322 satisfies the “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits 

PHIL 324. TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN VALUES
A philosophical examination of social and ethical issues relating to technology. Topics include: ethical responsibilities of engineers; the ethical of risk assessment and cost-benefit analysis, environmental sustainability and technology; technology and human nature; technology and globalization; and the impact of modern technology on human values. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. (PHIL 324 satisfies the “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 325. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
A study of ethical and social issues concerning the relation of humans to the natural environment. Topics include the history of environmental ethics, the application of various ethical theories and concepts to environmental concerns, sustainability and ethical responsibilities to future genertions, and the relevance of the scientific, technological, economic, legal, and socio-political considerations in the analysis of current issues in environmental ethics.  Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher.  (PHIL 325 satisfies the “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 335. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
An examination of philosophical issues relating to religion, the concept of God, arguments for and against God’s existence, the nature of religious experience, knowledge, faith, the problem of evil and free will. (Same as RS 335). Prerequisite: any RS 200 course or higher. One semester; three credits

PHIL 340. ETHICAL THEORY
An examination of various philosophical theories, including those of Aristotle, Kant, and Mill, concerning moral values. Questions discussed include the following: whether morality is best defined in terms of rights, duties, consequences, authenticity of commitment, or models of virtue, and whether morality can be judged by some absolute standard or is always relative (and if so, to what?). Prerequisites: sophomore standing or higher. (PHIL 340 satisfies the “Moral Values” general education  requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 350. PHILOSOPHY OF THE ARTS
A study of various philosophical responses to questions concerning art. Topics include the nature of art, the relation between different arts, the nature of artistic creation, and the problem of evaluating works of art. Examples from literature, music, and the visual arts. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. One semester; three credits

PHIL 380-389. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY
Special topics in philosophy open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. One semester; one to four credits

PHIL 391-396. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ETHICS
Selected philosophical topics in the area of meta-ethics, normative ethics, or applied ethics; content variable with instructor. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. (PHIL 395 satisfies the “Moral Values”  general education requirement). One semester; three credits

PHIL 491-496. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY
Selected philosophical topics; content variable with instructor. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. One semester each; one to three credits each

PHIL 497. SENIOR SEMINAR (formerly PHIL 499)
This seminar, for Religion & Philosophy majors in their Senior year, introduces students to philosophical, theological, and scriptural research methods to prepare students for satisfactory completion of their Senior Projects (PHIL/RS 498). During this semester long seminar, each student will develop a research program for his or her senior thesis, with the semester culminating in a presentation of each student’s project proposal and outline. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

PHIL 498. SENIOR PROJECT
The senior project is a capstone independent study requirement for Senior Religion & Philosophy majors.  Under the supervision of a senior project faculty advisor, each student will assemble a committee of three  departmental faculty members to evaluate a research paper related to the student’s previous studies in religion  and/or philosophy. The final project will also be presented to the faculty of the Religion & Philosophy  Department. Prerequisite: either PHIL 497 or RS 497. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; two credits

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RS 200. UNDERSTANDING RELIGION
An introduction to religion through a comparative study of all aspects of religious experience in Christianity and other religious traditions. This course will address existential and theological questions through a study of scriptures, sacred reality, symbol, ritual, and ethics. One semester; three credits

RS 217. OLD TESTAMENT (HEBREW SCRIPTURES)
Using the Old Testament as a text and a guide, the course explores the origins and early history of the Jewish people to the Maccabean revolt and encompasses concepts such as Covenant, Prophecy, Messiah. One semester; three credits

RS 218. NEW TESTAMENT
A discussion of the Christian scriptures from literary, historical, and theological points of view concentrating on the life and teachings of Christ and the spread of Christianity after His death and resurrection. One semester; three credits

RS 220. CLASSICAL CHRISTIAN THOUGHT
An examination of major themes and issues in Christian history and theology from the time of the early Church through the Reformation. Major theologians such as Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, and Calvin will be studied among others, along with the expression of Christianity through art, architecture, and religious practice. One semester; three credits 

RS 221. MODERN CHRISTIAN THOUGHT
An examination of major themes and issues in Christian theology after the Reformation to the early twentieth century. The focus will be on responses within Christian theology to modern science and to the emergence of democracy and capitalism. One semester; three credits

RS 230. CHRISTIAN ETHICS
A critical investigation of the theological convictions grounding Christian understandings of doing what is right and being a good human person. This will include approaches to ethics from within both Catholic and Protestant Christianity, along with analysis of selected moral issues. One semester; three credits

RS 240. THE RELIGIOUS DIMENSION OF WORK (Formerly RS 315)
A study of the relationships between work and religion in western society. Career, studied from several perspectives, will be viewed ultimately as a vocation-a call from God. One semester: three credits 

RS 245. HONORS RELIGION AND SCIENCE
This interdisciplinary course focuses on the way religion and science jointly contribute to our knowledge. It is based on the premise that no one source of knowledge, theological or otherwise, can alone provide a complete description of reality. Readings and guest lecturers from other disciplines will cover a wide-ranging dialogue dealing with issues in astronomy, physics, biology, and ecology. A spectrum of possibilities for the relation between religion and science will be considered, including the options of conflict, independence, dialogue, and interaction. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program or permission of the instructor. One semester; three credits 

RS 254. CHRISTIANITY AND PEACE
An analysis of historical Christian attitudes toward war and peace. Theological and moral arguments for the pacifist and just war traditions will be analyzed, along with their application to forms of state sanctioned violence such as war and capital punishment and the new challenges to these traditions such as military intervention and terrorism. (Same as HUM 254) One semester; three credits

RS 260. PERSON, WORLD, AND GOD
This course will focus phenomenologically on ways to recognize God’s presence in our everyday lives. How does one person’s religious experience compare/contrast with another’s? Personality types, prayer forms, biblical references, and theological studies will be examined in tandem with lived experiences. One semester; three credits

RS 270. WORLD RELIGIONS
A survey of the great eastern and western religious traditions. The course covers the history, beliefs, practices, symbols, and sacred scriptures of select religions, including indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and new religious movements. The course will include visits to religious sites in Memphis. One semester; three credits

RS 271. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (formerly RS 371)
The study of the beliefs, practices, and organizational forms of religion using the tools and methods of sociology. Topics covered may include the relation of beliefs to social conditions, the role of religion in cultural formation and public life, religious pluralism and conflict, the nature of religious cults and sects, the influence of religion on racial, gender, and sexuality issues, and the affect modernity has on religious belief and practice. (same as SOC 271). Prerequisite: SOC 101. One semester; three credits

RS 280. CATHOLICISM
An examination of the teachings, structures and cultural influence of Roman Catholicism with emphasis on the Catholic understanding of Jesus Christ, the nature of the church, the Sacraments and the human person. One semester; three credits

RS 285. The Church in the World
A study of the theology and organization of various major Christian churches in terms of their relation with the world and each other. Different models of being church will be analyzed, including approaches to authority, worship, and religious pluralism. One semester; three credits

RS 290-294. SELECTED TOPICS IN RELIGION
Selected topics of special interest at an introductory level. Topics vary with instructor. One semester; three credits 

RS 295-299. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN RELIGION
Selected topics of special interest in Religious Studies open to members of the Honors Program or by permission  of the instructor. One semester; three credits

RS 300. JESUS CHRIST
An investigation into the historical features of Jesus’ ministry and message and His importance in the world today. The course will examine Christian doctrine about Jesus and probe the reasons for His appeal through the centuries. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 320. RELIGION IN AMERICA
An examination of the various religious communities of the United States, how they were shaped by and helped shape the American culture. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 324. CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY
An examination of key figures and themes in Christian spirituality in terms of their different approaches to living the Christian life. Analysis will be made of each approach to spirituality in relation to Christian beliefs and values, the manner in which the spirituality is expressed in the daily practice of Christian life and the time period in which the spirituality developed. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 326. Social and Political Theologies
A critical examination of contemporary social and political theologies, such as liberation theology, black theology, feminist theology and womanist theology.  Special attention will be given to the importance of social context in developing such theologies and their ways of drawing from and critiquing traditional Christian theological views. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 330. JUSTICE AND SOCIETY
A study of issues relating to justice and human rights in contemporary social life (economic, political, cultural), focusing on the contributions of developing social justice teachings of the churches. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 331. THE SPIRITUALITY AND ETHICS OF EATING
This course examines the role of food and eating in the sacred texts and rituals of Judaism and Christianity in order to explore the thesis that food is not primarily a commodity but a relationship linking people to one anotherr, to God, to the land, plants, and animals. Students additionally examine the contemporary environmental, ethical, and spiritual dimensions of food and the way these are reflected in our eating practices. Students are required to complete a service project for this course. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 335. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
(Same as PHIL 335) Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 340. African American Theology
This course is a survey of black theology in the United States from its roots in Africa and Christian missions through the period of slavery to the present day with special emphasis on contemporary works of Black Liberation Theology. The course will introduce students to the significant development of Christian theology by African Americans. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 345. GOD, EVIL AND SUFFERING
A consideration of the question of religious faith in the face of evil and seemingly senseless pain and suffering, as well as some of the more carefully-reasoned responses proffered within the history of Christian thought, both traditional and modern. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 355. JUDAISM
Introduction to the history, religion, literature, and practices of rabbinic Judaism. This course will examine how the foundational heritage of the Hebrew Bible and the Israelite people transformed into the institutions and rituals of modern Jewish experience. Course will also examine issues such as Jewish-Christian dialogue, the Holocaust, and the modern state of Israel. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 360. ISLAM
An analysis of the Islamic faith, its history, major beliefs, contribution to civilization around the world, and relationship with Judaism and Christianity. Course topics include the five pillars of Islam. Jihad, male/female, relations, worship and celebrations, community life, and contemporary global and geopolitical issues in relation to Islam. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 372. WOMEN AND CHRISTIANITY
A historical and theological survey of the role of women in Christianity. Beginning from Christian origins, this course examines representations of women as apostles, prophets, martyrs, nuns and beguines, mystics, mothers, and wives. Special attention will be paid to theological discussions of the position of women, as well as contemporary reevaluations. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 375. THE PROPHETS
The movement that began with the 8th century BCE prophets of Israel marked a clear departure from the social and religious world view prevalent in the ancient Near East. This course will examine the background and literature of the prophetic movement with its agenda for social, religious, and political reforms. It will stress how prophets such as Amos, Jeremiah, and Isaiah were able to have a lasting impact on Western thought and religion through their views of Israel’s relationship with neighboring nations, God, and future humanity. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 377. APOCALYPTIC IMAGINATION
A critical examination of apocalyptic texts and traditions in the ancient and modern worlds, with special attention to the book of Revelation. The course also explores modern appropriations of apocalyptic literature in theology, art, and film, and will give attention to more recent movements with apocalyptic overtones. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 380. PAUL: HIS LIFE AND HIS LETTERS
An historical and theological examination of the Apostle Paul and the Pauline letters, especially as they reflect the concerns of developing Christianity, including such issues as apocalypticism and the relation of Christian communities to the Jewish faith and the Roman Empire. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 385. THE GOSPELS
A study of the four Gospels using contemporary techniques of biblical interpretation with particular emphasis on the developing Jewish tradition in the early Christian Community. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 390-394. SPECIAL TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Selected topics of special interest at an advanced level. Topics vary with instructor. Prerequisite: any RS 200  level course. One semester; three credits

RS 395-399. HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Special topics in religious studies open to members of the Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits

RS 400. CATHOLIC THOUGHT AND CULTURE THROUGH THE AGES
An interdisciplinary exploration of the wisdom of the Catholic tradition expressed through works of intellect and imagination. from the beginning of the Church up to contemporary times. Classics in literature, art, theology, philosophy, music, the sciences, and/or architecture are discussed. Emphasis is placed on recognizing the integrity of the grounding Catholic vision and on tracing the unified development and expansion of that vision over time. (Note: meets with MACS 600). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS. 402. CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS THOUGHT
A serious study of one or more selected theologians and religious thinkers from the twentieth century. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course. One semester; three credits 

RS 405. HONORS CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS THOUGHT
This course is designed to study 20th century theologians and their theologies concerning scripture, tradition, and human experience. Prerequisite: any RS 200 level course and membership in the Honors Program. One semester; three credits

RS 410. CATHOLIC BIBLICAL STUDIES
What is a Catholic approach to the study of the Bible? The course will begin with the Church’s teaching on biblical interpretation as contained in such documents as Divino Afflante Spiritu, Dei Verbum, and “The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church.” Selected texts from the Old and New Testaments will then be studies using the Catholic Church’s approach to biblical interpretation in contrast to fundamentalism. (Note: meets with MACS 610). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 420. CATHOLIC SPIRITUALITY
An exploration of the relationship between religious experience and theological reflection as seen in the works of outstanding spiritual writers of the Catholic tradition, including St. Benedict, St. Francis and St. Clare, St. John Baptist de La Salle. This will include attention to prayer, forms of spirituality, and asceticism. (Note: meets with MACS 620). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 430. GOD AND HUMAN PERSON
An investigation of the Catholic doctrine of the human person in relation to God, including topics such as creation and fall, sin and grace, justification and sanctification, and eschatological fulfillment. (Note: meets with MACS 630). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 440. CHRISTOLOGY
Understanding the person, presence and mission of Christ in Scripture, doctrine and dogma and in contemporary theology. (Note: meets with MACS 640). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 450. THEOLOGY OF SACRAMENTS AND WORSHIP
An examination of the historical development of sacramental life in the Church and theological reflection on the sacraments. This will include contemporary approaches to the theology of sacraments, especially in relation to Christology and ecclesiology. (Note: meets with MACS 650). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy.. One semester; three credits

RS 460. MORAL THEOLOGY
A study of the foundations of the Christian moral life, including freedom and moral agency, moral norms and moral reasoning, the place of scripture, tradition, and authority in the moral life, virtues and development of moral character. (Note: meets with MACS 660). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 470. CATHOLIC SOCIAL ETHICS
Critical analysis of the Biblical and theological foundations for Catholic social teaching and the teachings of the Catholic Church on matters such as war and peace; the rights and duties of states and citizens; the rights, duties, and obligations of members of a family; the rights, duties, and obligations of parents with respect to their children. (Note: meets with MACS 670). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 480. CATHOLICISM AND OTHER FAITH TRADITIONS
Drawing upon the teachings of Vatican II and other ecclesial documents, this course will explore the relationship between Catholicism and other faith traditions, both Christian and non-Christian. (Note: meets with MACS 680). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 485. INTERNSHIP
Combines work in a professional field with academic consideration of the relationship of that work to Religious Studies. Prerequisite: Permission of the Religious Studies Internship Director. One semester; one to three credits

RS 490. ECCLESIOLOGY AND MINISTRY
A consideration of the nature and structure of the Catholic Church, including its apostolic origins, the Church as communion and sacrament, magisterium and authority, the relation of the local and universal Church, evangelization, ministry and mission. Students will reflect upon their ministry plans/work in relation to the Church’s mission. (Note: meets with MACS 690). Prerequisite: any RS 300 level course and permission of the chair of Religion & Philosophy. One semester; three credits

RS 491-496. SPECIAL TOPICS IN RELIGION
Selected topics of interest to individual students or small groups. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. One semester; one to three credits

RS 497. SENIOR SEMINAR (formerly RS 499)
This seminar, for Religion & Philosophy majors in their Senior year, introduces students to philosophical, theological, and scriptural research methods to prepare students for satisfactory completion of their Senior Projects (PHIL/RS 498). During this semester long seminar, each student will develop a research program for their senior thesis, with the semester culminating in a presentation of each student’s project proposal and outline. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; one credit

RS 498. SENIOR PROJECT
The senior project is a capstone independent study requirement for Senior Religion & Philosophy majors. Under the supervision of a senior project faculty advisor, each student will assemble a committee of three departmental faculty members to evaluate a research paper related to the student’s previous studies in religion and/or philosophy. The final project will also be presented to the faculty of the Religion & Philosophy Department. Prerequisite: either PHIL 497 or RS 497. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; two credits


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