Behavioral Sciences Faculty

The Rosa DealSchool of Arts

Behavioral Sciences Faculty

Dr. Tracie Burke, Professor, Director of Honors Program, grew up on a small farm in rural northwestern Montana near Glacier National Park. There she became an expert at milking cows, riding horses and horrifying her  parents with daring acts of cowgirl pluck. At the age of seven she joined the local judo club and spent the next fifteen years competing in local, regional, and eventually national and international tournaments. Her early competitions usually resulted in "best sportsmanship" trophies (translation: she was a big loser). But later on she became more successful, joining the United States team and traveling with it to Europe and Asia. She earned her B.A. degree in psychology at the University of Montana, and her  M.S. in General Psychology (concentration in industrial/organizational psychology), Ed.D. in Educational Psychology, and M.A. in Sociology from the University of Memphis. Her research interests include active learning and using humor in the classroom.

Dr. Mary F. Campbell, Assistant Professor, is a native of Memphis and earned both her B.A. and M.A. from the University of Memphis’ Department of Anthropology and her Ph.D. in Medical Anthropology from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. Her courses include Cultural Anthropology, Marriage and Family, Biocultural Epidemiology, and Medical Anthropology. She is also the Practicum Coordinator for Behavioral Sciences. Her research interests include immigrant health, gender studies, and food insecurity.  

Dr. Kelly James, Assistant Professor, grew up in Memphis and has recently returned home to teach at CBU. She attended the University of Memphis to earn a B.A. in Social Work and an M.A. in Sociology. After teaching at different universities in Memphis, Dr. James decided to move south to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to attend LSU for the doctoral program in Sociology with a Minor in Women’s Studies. Although she has been a Tiger fan most of her life, she has come to love the Buccaneers and is proud to cheer the Bucs on. Dr. James is trained in mediation and conflict resolution, which is also a course she teaches at CBU. Her teaching interests include peace and justice studies, deviance, and sexuality and social problems.  

Chanda Murphy, Instructor, was born in Orlando, FL, but has lived in Memphis most of her life. She graduated from Christian Brothers University with a B.A. in Psychology. Immediately following undergrad, professor Murphy accepted a corporate training and instructional design position with Sedgwick CMS. In this job she traveled the country training new employees as well as designing new courses and curriculum for the company. After five years with Sedgwick CMS, professor Murphy decided to go to graduate school in the area of Industrial Organizational Psychology at the University of Memphis. She received her M.S. in General Psychology and is finishing her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology with a concentration in Industrial Organizational Psychology. Her areas of research include web usability, team effectiveness, and effective teaching techniques for long term retention. Professor Murphy also does consulting work in Memphis within the fields of personnel hiring and talent management. Professor Murphy is also a founder and coordinator of the local charity Cheer for the Kids which raises approximately $40,000 for Make-A-Wish of the Mid-South annually.

Dr. Maureen O'Brien, Associate Professor, is a native of Memphis. Technically, she grew up in Southaven, MS, but most folks don't know where that is, so she's learned to take the easy route and claim to be from Memphis. She grew up with three older brothers, and at age 9 they were joined by a younger brother. "Being the only girl in a family of five kids had its ups and downs. My brothers are now much more mature, and we get along great." She received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and her M.S. in General Psychology from The University of Memphis, and a B.A. in Psychology from CBU. "My most exciting job (before being hired by CBU, of course) was being a tour guide at Graceland in high school. I have noticed a negative correlation between interest level and distance from Memphis. That is, the further away from Memphis one lives the more interested one is in discovering I was a tour guide at Graceland." Her research interests include prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination, attitude change and persuasion, and resistance to persuasion. In her spare time, she enjoys live music, playing guitar, cooking, and being entertained by her super cute pets. "I also enjoy traveling, which provides me the added bonus of testing my belief in the earlier mentioned correlation!"

Dr. Jeff Sable, Associate Professor, earned his B.A. in Psychology with a minor in business administration from Drury College (now Drury University) in Springfield, Missouri; his M.S. in Psychology (emphasis in physiological psychology) from Kansas State University; and his Ph.D. in Psychology (emphasis in cognition and neuroscience) with a graduate minor in college teaching from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He did postdoctoral work in neuroscience at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Sable is a cognitive neuroscientist who studies what people are thinking when they don’t know that they are thinking. He is especially interested in processes related to attention, perception, and cognition that happen automatically and without conscious effort or even awareness, and he often measures physiological activity—such as brain activity—to study these processes. He is familiar with many psychophysiological methods, ranging from direct measures of the brain (e.g., EEG, MEG, fMRI, PET) to indirect measures of its influence on the body (e.g., muscle activity, heart rate, sweating). Dr. Sable has helped to bring several of these methods to CBU (see here for examples of how they are being used), and received a grant from the National Science Foundation to set up a 64-channel EEG system. Dr. Sable’s Biological Psychology course (which is required for psychology majors) includes several activities in which students get hands-on experience recording their own physiological activity (e.g., brain activity, muscle activity, stress response). He is a strong advocate of engaging students in the scientific process, both inside and outside the classroom.

Dr. Colby Taylor, Visiting Assistant Professor, is a native of Memphis. He earned his B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. in School Psychology at the University of Memphis. He completed his pre-doctoral internship in Hawaii on the beautiful island of Kauai, where he balanced his clinical work with snorkeling and standup paddleboarding. Upon returning to Memphis, he completed a year of supervised post-doctoral practice with Shelby County Schools. Dr. Taylor’s research interests are related to research methodology, assessment, and reading fluency.  

Dr. Rodney Vogl (Chair), Professor, grew up on a small farm in rural Iowa. He received his B.S. in Psychology from the University of Iowa. He then migrated south for graduate school, where he received his M.S. in Psychology and his Ph.D. in Human Experimental Psychology from Kansas State University. Dr. Vogl is a cognitive psychologist interested in memory, human factors/ergonomics, problem solving and decision making. He teaches classes in all of these areas, including classes regarding research methodology/statistics, social psychology, and general psychology. Dr. Vogl’s area of expertise within cognitive psychology is memory. During his years at Kansas State University, he worked with students with memory deficits (due to Traumatic Brain Injury) and students with learning disabilities. Additionally, he was part of a team that studied the extraordinary memory skill of a person who had been in the Guinness Book of World Records for memorizing pi to 31,811 places. Dr. Vogl then concluded his southern migration when he decided to join the faculty at Christian Brothers University. He has published several journal articles and book chapters on memory in the “real world," and has presented numerous papers with students and other colleagues at psychology conferences both regionally and nationally. Dr. Vogl has a variety of interests in psychology that span both cognitive psychology and social psychology. For example, he is interested in how one’s social interactions with others help the person to reduce the impact of negative memories. His research interests also include memory for lies, involuntary memories (i.e., those memories that “pop” into our head), memory errors (e.g., source confusion) and other areas of cognition such as problem solving and human factors.