Business Administration Courses • Business Courses | CBU

School ofBusiness

Business Administration Courses

The following are core and elective courses offered within the BSBA degree in Business Administration, Business Law, and Economics. For BSBA concentration courses, please see the web pages for each concentration.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUS 103. FUNDAMENTALS OF BUSINESS
This course covers the basic business concepts, disciplines, and practices. It surveys major types of business institutions, functional areas of business organizations, and business processes. It provides an orientation into the modern business world for both future business majors and also for other majors. NOTE: if taken by students with 24 hours or more, credit will not count for B.S. degree with a major in Accounting or Business Administration. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BUS 160-164. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Each course is designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in one or more areas of business administration. Offered as needed. One semester; one to three credits

BUS 205. BUSINESS PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
This course covers basic concepts and methods of probability and statistics for use in the business disciplines. Topics include: quantitative analysis, measurement scales, analysis and description of data, types and methods for probability estimation, probability distributions, and measures of central tendency, skewness, and dispersion. Use of computer spreadsheet models for probability and statistics is covered. Prerequisites: MIS 153, MATH 105 or higher, and admission to the Professional Studies program. One semester; three credits

BUS 206. BUSINESS RESEARCH METHODS
This course covers the basic concepts and methods for business research. Topics covered include both primary research (observations, experiments, surveys, focus groups, etc.) and secondary research (library and internet literature searching). Research proposal and research report writing is also included. Sampling, data analysis, regression, and hypothesis testing is covered using computer spreadsheet models. Prerequisites: BUS 205 or STAT 221, MIS 153, MATH 105, and admission to the Professional Studies program. One semester; three credits.

BUS 260-264. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Each course is designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in one or more areas of business administration. Offered as needed. One semester; one to three credits

BUS 360-364. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Each course is designed to permit intensive study into topics of special interest and timeliness in one or more areas of business administration. Offered as needed. One semester; one to three credits

BUS 499. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
Seniors will be required to take a comprehensive examination in the student’s field(s) of concentration The examination date will be announced. A passing score is required for graduation. Prerequisite: Dean of the School of Business. Pass/Fail Grading. One semester, zero credits.

BUSINESS LAW

BLAW 301. BUSINESS LAW I (Formerly BUS 301)
The origins and general survey of contract law along with the nature, formation, execution, and interpretation of contracts in the common law system. Emphasis is on instruction in legal principles that govern typical business situations and on the rules of law and procedure applied by the courts in the United States. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BLAW 302. BUSINESS LAW II (Formerly BUS 302)
Continuation of BLAW 301. In-depth study of the Uniform Commercial Code and its far reaching effects on modern business transactions; the laws of agency, partnerships and corporations, and the legal concept of property. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

BLAW 345. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS (Formerly BUS 345)
The course deals with administrative law. Primary areas of concentration include anti-trust law, consumer protection, securities regulation, labor law, and environmental law. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ECONOMICS

ECON 214. PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (Formerly ECON 212)
Attention is focused on the mirco concept of economic analysis, and primary attention given to the theory of the firm and partial equilibrium problems arising within any enterprise economy. Attention is also given to government regulation of business, the theory of income distribution as it pertains to the determination of wages, rents and profits, and international trade. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

ECON 215. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (Formerly ECON 211)
This course focuses attention on the aggregate or macroeconomic relationships and gives attention to the central problems of economic organization, the functioning of the price system, the economic role of government, the determination of national income, employment, the rate of inflation, and fiscal and monetary policy. Further, the student is introduced to the interactions between aggregate markets such as the product market, the factor/labor market, and the money market. Prerequisite: ECON 214. Offered in both Fall and Spring semesters. One semester; three credits

ECON 323. THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH AND HEALTHCARE
The course uses the tools of economic thinking and economic analysis to examine the current state of health and healthcare in the United States. Economic concepts to be discussed include scarcity, rationing, the roles of the free market and government, sensitivity to price, determinants of the demand for, and the supply of, healthcare, and production possibilities. These and other tools will be used to examine such topics as changing demographics, alternative production and delivery systems, health insurance, regulation of the health sector, and the legal environment. Prerequisite: ECON 214 or consent of instructor. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

ECON 325. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
This course will examine the emerging field of environmental economics - that is, the connections between economics and the environment. Topics will include the sources of environmental problems, the concept of natural capital, sustainable development, and how to balance environmental policy, economic growth and the constraints of a market based economic system. One semester; three credits

ECON 343. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
The theory of national income and employment, analysis of aggregate demand, the general degree of utilization of productive resources and the general level of prices as well as related questions of policy. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 344. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
A study of basic economic theory as it pertains to the individual economic units of a society, a study of the tools which are used in analyzing these units. Price determination, market analysis, and resource allocation are stressed. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in the Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 346. CURRENT ECONOMIC TOPICS
Analysis and discussion of current issues from an economic perspective. Possible subject areas include the environment, health care, comparative economic systems, welfare, growth and development, crime, religion and economics, and other current topics. The course may examine several current issues or may focus on just one or two. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

ECON 347. SUSTAINABILITY, CULTURE, AND ECONOMICS
This course will examine the relationship bwtween these three topics by choosing one area of the world, such as Asia, Europe, and Latin America, and selecting specific countries in one of these areas for a micro and macro comparison. This course will includee optional travel to one of these areas during fall, winter, spring or summer break. One semester; three credits

ECON 400. ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP
Under the supervision of a faculty member from the appropriate department, students in the School of Business, after receiving the approval of the faculty, are placed in the offices of cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training under the supervision of members of the firm. Credit is granted upon acceptance of periodic reports and a final summary report of work done verified by the authorized supervisor and the instructor. Offered in the Fall and Spring. Pass/Fail grading. One semester; three credits

ECON 420. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS
This courses focuses on the application of economics theory to the problems and decisions faced by business managers in a market-oriented economy. The economic aspects of business departments such as marketing, finance, accounting, and law are explored and integrated into the applicable economic theories and models. Thus, in a very general sense, this course attempts to provide the student with a method of looking at the world of microeconomics through the eyes of an economist and from the perspective of a business person. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in both Fall and Spring semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 422. INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND ECONOMICS
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of international trade, marketing, and finance. Specific topics which will be introduced include but are not limited to: tariffs, subsidies, import restrictions, foreign exchange, methods, agencies, and middlemen and business practices which influence trade relations. In addition, students will study the basics of the field of International Business including national differences in political economy and culture, global trade and investments, foreign direct investments, regional economic integration, foreign exchange markets, and strategic alliances. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered in the Fall semester. One semester; three credits

ECON 450. ECONOMICS POLICY
Application of economic theory and methodology to the study of decision making in both the political arena and various government agencies. This will include the study of politics using the economic ways of thinking, various theories of justice and approaches to public policy, analysis of representative/democratic government, study of decision making inside bureaucracies, and development of the process of public policy formulation and implementation. Among the policy areas covered will be an analysis of policy programs in the areas of education, welfare, and health care. Prerequisites: ECON 214. Offered as needed. One semester; three credits

ECON 460-466. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS
The reading and discussion of significant economic literature. The course is designed to improve the student’s approach to modern economic problem solving and to stimulate economic thinking and the analysis of modern business problems. Prerequisites: ECON 214, 215. Offered as needed. One semester: three credits