Popular Summer Courses
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Popular Summer Courses

June Term

ART 208. CERAMICS I 
This course will teach the fundamentals of ceramics through the techniques of coil and slab. One semester; three credits. 

ENG 211. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE I
A study of the literary forms of the novel and the short story, including the reading of significant world novels and short stories. This course will include an emphasis on writing skills cultivated in ENG 111 and 112. Prerequisites: ENG 111 and 112. One semester; three credits

ENG 212. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE II 
A study of the literary forms of drama and poetry, including literature that represents a range of racial, ethnic, and cultural perspectives. This course will include an emphasis on writing skills cultivated in ENG 111 and 112. Prerequisites: ENG 112. One semester; three credits 

CHEM 211. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
This course uses both a mechanistic and functional-group approach to introduce organic concepts. Topics include bonding, functional groups, stereochemistry, acids and bases, and conformations. Mechanisms covered include electrophilic addition, SN2, SN1, E1, E2 and radical reactions. This course deals with compounds from the aliphatic series. Prerequisites: CHEM 113, CHEM 113L, CHEM 114, and CHEM 114L with a minimum grade of “C” in each course. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 211L. One semester; three credits

CHEM 211L. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY
This course is designed to teach the student the techniques of organic chemistry as well as to carry out reactions discussed in class. Some of the techniques presented are distillation, recrystallization, and extraction. The experiments will teach the proper methods of carrying out reactions. Prerequisites: CHEM 113, CHEM 113L, CHEM 114, and CHEM 114L with a minimum grade of “C” in each course. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 211. One semester; one credit.

BIOL 111. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I 
The first half of a comprehensive study of contemporary biology, this semester covers biochemistry, cytology, energy metabolism, photosynthesis, cell division, genetics, evolution, systematics and taxonomy of viruses and prokaryotes. This course includes three lectures and one discussion section per week. Prerequisite: minimum ACT math score of 20 or above or ALG 115; ACT composite of 22 or higher, or CHEM 101 with a grade of “C” or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 111L (CHEM 101 or CHEM 113/L strongly recommended). One semester; three credits. 

BIOL 111L. PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I LABORATORY 
Laboratory experience to illustrate and explain the principles covered in BIOL 111. Prerequisites: minimum ACT math score of 20 or above or ALG 115; ACT composite of 22 or higher, or CHEM 101 with a grade of “C” or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 111L (CHEM 101 or CHEM 113/L strongly recommended). One semester; one credit 

NSCI 122. THE NATURE OF LIGHT 
An introduction to the field of optics for non-science majors. The question for the course is “What is light?” Different theories that model light as rays, waves, and photons are discussed to explain phenomena ranging from the formation of rainbows and mirages to the operation of lenses, lasers, holograms, and optical fibers. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Corequisite: NSCI 122L. One semester; three credits 

PHIL 322. MEDICAL ETHICS 
A review and evaluation of various theories of moral philosophy and an investigation into some of the current moral issues in the fields of biology and medicine. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. (Satisfies the “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits 

PHYS 150. PHYSICS I 
A beginning course in physics covering the topics of kinematics, dynamics, gravitation, work, energy, momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 129 or 131. Corequisite: PHYS 150L. One semester; three credits 

PHYS 150L. PHYSICS I LABORATORY 
Laboratory to accompany PHYS 150. Prerequisite: MATH 129 or 131. Corequisite: PHYS 150. One semester; one credit 

PSYC 105. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 
An introduction to the discipline of psychology as a science of behavior. Areas of study include biological aspects of psychology, learning, perception, personality, abnormal behavior, psychological research, social and developmental psychology. Psychology and Applied Psychology majors must complete the course with a grade of “C” or higher. One semester; three credits 

RS 217. OLD TESTAMENT (HEBREW SCRIPTURES) 
Using the Old Testament as a text and a guide, the course explores the origins and early history of the Jewish people to the Maccabean revolt and encompasses concepts such as Covenant, Prophecy, Messiah. One semester; three credits 

RS 270. WORLD RELIGIONS
A survey of the great eastern and western religious traditions. The course covers the history, beliefs, practices, symbols, and sacred scriptures of select religions, including indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and new religious movements. The course will include visits to religious sites in Memphis. One semester; three credits 

SOC 351. SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY 
A survey of changes in family systems over the years. Areas of study include courtship, love, mate selection, parenthood, and family problems. The course also examines cross-cultural comparisons and considers alternatives to traditional family forms. Emphasis is placed on the use of the empirical evidence to evaluate popular beliefs. (Same as ANTH 351.) One semester; three credits 

July Term

ART 106. PHOTOSHOP ESSENTIALS 
This course is an introduction to the user interface, tools, and features of Adobe Photoshop. Students begin working with the industry standard for creating raster/bitmap graphics. This incredibly deep program is used for graphic design, web design, image manipulation, photo restoration, digital illustration, lighting effects, and animation. By the end, students will have progressed from a beginning to intermediate skill level, able to command many of the powerful tools Photoshop has to offer. Payment of expendable materials fee is required. Basic computer skills are necessary for the best outcome for this course. One semester; three credits. 

ART 205. BEGINNING DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
An introduction to the fundamentals of digital photography. The course emphasis is on understanding photography as a tool for visual expression. Payment of expendable materials fee is required. One semester; three credits

BIOL 103. BIOLOGY OF ADDICTION 
In this course, we will cover the biological effects of alcohol and drugs on human organ systems, particularly the nervous, digestive, excretory and reproductive systems. We will discuss the psychological and sociological consequences of these effects. The use of drugs in both therapeutic and pathologic situations will be explored, and modalities of recovery will be discussed. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Credits not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; three credits 

BIOL 103L. BIOLOGY OF ADDICTION LAB 
In this course, we will examine the anatomy and physiology of organ systems affected by alcohol and other psychoactive drugs of abuse. We will use fruit flies as a model to determine the effects of alcohol on their physiology and reproductive success. We will conduct two experiments on human volunteers: effects of caffeine on the cardiovascular system and the effects of ethanol on balance, equilibrium, and judgment. With the laboratory component, this course fulfills University graduation requirements. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 103. Credit not applicable to the BS in Biology and Biomedical Sciences biology elective requirement. One semester; one credit 

ENG 111. ENGLISH COMPOSITION I 
An introduction to academic writing and critical reading. Writing sequences with practical application of specific strategies for invention, drafting, frequent revision, peer review, and editing. Special sections which focus on a specific topic may be designated. Prerequisites: ENG 100 or 101 or ACT English score of 20. One semester; three credits 

ENG 112. ENGLISH COMPOSITION II 
An introduction to argumentative strategies, research skills, and other applied writing. Students will write several short pieces and a research paper. Special sections which focus on a specific topic may be designated. Prerequisite: ENG 111. One semester; three credits 

MATH 131. CALCULUS I
The goals of the course are to teach the student important concepts of calculus and its applications. Topics include functions, the derivative and its interpretations, the definite integral and its interpretations, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative and antiderivatives. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. A student can receive credit for only one of MATH 129 or 131. Prerequisite: MATH 110 with a grade of “C” or higher, or MATH 117 with a grade of “C” or higher. This prerequisite is waived for a student who passes a departmental placement test. A grade of “C” or higher in this course is required to proceed to MATH 132. One semester; three credits

PHIL 224. THEORIES OF HUMAN NATURE 
An examination of several major theories of human nature with special emphasis on the ethical implications of these theories. A consideration of such questions as whether humans are by nature either good or evil, individual or social, free or determined in their actions, and whether they have some natural purpose or end. (Satisfies the “Moral Values” general education requirement). One semester; three credits 

PHYS 251. PHYSICS II
A second course in physics covering electric forces, electric fields, voltage, capacitance, current, resistance, magnetic forces, magnetic fields, induction, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite PHYS 150. Corequisite: PHYS 251L. One semester; three credits

PHYS 251L. PHYSICS II LABORATORY
Laboratory to accompany PHYS 251. Corequisite: PHYS 251. One semester; one credit