Pre-Law Program
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Pre-Law Program

CBU’s Pre-Law advisor provides advice on preparing for, choosing, and applying to law school, information about the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), and access to publications from law schools across the United States.

The Pre-Law Society sponsors visits by law school representatives and other on-campus activities, including Constitution Day and policital debates during election years.
 
PRE-LAW COURSES:

PREL/POLS 215 INTRODUCTION TO LAW
This course is intended to introduce the student to the American legal system and to various practice areas of the law. Topics discussed include: how (and why) the American legal system is organized, including how the legislative process and executive branch are involved in this system; the focus on the role of ethics, procedure, and jurisdiction in the law; and an introduction to the primary substantive areas of the law that first year law students encounter, including torts, family, estate, property, contracts, business, and criminal law. (Same as PREL 215). No prerequisite. One semester; three credits

PREL 216 PRE-LAW PRACTICUM
The Pre-Law Practicum will prepare students for the challenges of law students. The emphasis will be on personal statement preparation, LSAT preparation, and the application process. No prerequisite. One semester; one credit  

POLS 370 INTERNATIONAL LAW
The history, formation and application of international law. Issues discussed include the sources of international law, the law of treaties, and rules regarding diplomacy, human rights, war/peace, war crimes, nationality, territory, and the global commons. Course readings shall include both secondary sources and legal texts. Prerequisites: Any political science or history course, or GS/HUM 200 or permission of the instructor. Recommended, but not required: POLS 113. One semester; three credits

PREL/POLS 310 U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 
An examination of the structure of U.S. government and the limits on governmental power through detailed analysis of the U.S. Constitution and Supreme Court decisions interpreting it. The course will also examine the appropriate scope of judicial review in a democratic society. Prerequisite: POLS 112 or HIST 151 or permission of the department head. One semester; three credits